Jack Neubart

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2008 3 comments

“You need to establish a connection with the food in front of the camera,” observes New York-based food photographer Francesco Tonelli (www.francescotonelli.com). “I can do a better job photographing a dish when I can picture myself eating it. That’s the frame of mind I need to be in so that I can capture the...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2008 1 comments

The original Nikon Capture NX could be compared to a four-cylinder vehicle: it would take you where you wanted to go when it came to raw conversion of Nikon NEF files, but it wasn’t the best ride for image editing. Compared to that, the newly released Capture NX 2 can be described as a six-cylinder roadster—sleek, yet powerful enough for a long drive. The additions and changes add...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

The mid-range zoom I started with when I bought my Nikon D300 was no speed demon, and I was hankering for an f/2.8 lens in the (effective) 70-200mm range. What first attracted me to the Tokina AT-X 535 PRO DX was the fast, constant maximum aperture, providing a bright view every step of the way. What’s more, the barrel on this tele-zoom does not rotate when zoomed: all movement is entirely...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

I’ve looked at and worked with many photo backpacks over the years. But when a new one comes along that looks more useful and comfy for short hops around town, traveling, or serious hiking, I have to try it out. Which brings me to the latest crop of camera backpacks from Adorama, Delsey, HPRC, Kata, Lowepro, Naneu Pro, Tamrac, and Tenba. These packs represent both incremental changes and...

Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

I've had many opportunities to work with battery-operated studio strobe systems. My problem with them was that they were heavy and bulky, not powerful enough, or simply too costly. Then I came upon the Opus Pro OPL-L300 location kit. I immediately noted that the 300 ws monolights were compact. Then I hefted the battery pack. Hmm, not bad, I thought. I could actually carry...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2008 4 comments

I've worked with all kinds of Internet photo studios over the years. Most consist of a light tent of sorts, with or without lights, and the materials used are translucent fabric or plastic. But I have never come across anything like the MyStudio 20 until now. It is definitely different. So, does different make it better, or even as functional as other tabletop setups?

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

A monolight (or monobloc, in some circles) is a self-contained strobe--and possibly the best way to get started in studio lighting. Self-contained means it does not require an external power pack to control its various functions with all the controls housed in the body. Most monolights plug into an AC outlet, although a few are driven by a separate, external battery pack. You...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

You might think that the sophisticated metering system in your camera is the be all and end all when it comes to exposure. The truth is, it does deliver remarkable results, but it can only take you so far. Want to tackle high-contrast scenes or tricky lighting or tonal situations without wasting a lot of time bracketing? Then you'll need a handheld meter. Shooting studio...

Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 01, 2008 2 comments

Twenty years in business together, the team of Bohm-Marrazzo (Montclair, New Jersey-- www.bohm-marrazzo.com) comes well equipped to tackle the challenge of photographing kids and animals for their advertising clients. Experience has taught them to incorporate these highly animated subjects into the picture to make an...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 01, 2008 2 comments

Sending out a CD/DVD to a duplicating service can cost hundreds of dollars--and requires a minimum order, usually in the neighborhood of several hundred copies, which is not a practical solution for most of us. Yes, there are inkjets capable of printing on pre-labeled discs, but one thing they can't do is duplicate CDs and DVDs--and the process is limited to one...

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