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Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 16, 2015 0 comments

One outing with the new Nikon D810 pro digital SLR convinced me that this camera is not only thoughtfully designed, a good fit, and easy to work with right out of the box, but that it’s also a solid performer that’s beautifully crafted. It has looks, smarts, and savvy, without being pretentious. And unlike enthusiast and entry-level cameras, it’s not filled with a bunch of useless toys no one really needs, wants, or uses (well, except for maybe a few of the post/retouching effects that seem to be wasted on this camera).

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Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 19, 2014 0 comments

Shoe-mounted flashes are handy tools. Where space or weight is a concern, a kit with two or three shoe-mounted flashes is much easier to carry than even the smallest power pack/head combo or a low-output monolight, and more versatile.

Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 12, 2014 0 comments

I’ve worked with DxO's OpticsPro imaging software for several years and have watched this program evolve and make great strides as a Raw image converter. What the new DxO OpticsPro 10 version of the software brings to the table is a cadre of new features and improvements. But are these enough to catapult this software into the top tier, or is it still playing catch-up?

Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 05, 2014 0 comments

One of the hottest categories these days are so-called “tough” cameras. They’re able to handle the elements on hikes and climbs made by hardy souls, are ideal for divers who want to record the wonders of the (fairly) deep, and are excellent choices for less arduous adventures, like a sunset stroll on a wind-blown Caribbean beach where a more delicate and expensive DSLR might be at risk. All can handle the rough and tumble of life where no mobile phone dares tread.

Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 21, 2014 0 comments

“I usually try to make the scene look and feel as natural as possible while still augmenting the available light,” Canadian-born photographer Peter Leverman observes. “I want the viewer to see the image and get what I’m trying to put across without the technique getting in the way.” By extension, Leverman knows when to leave well enough alone and simply use the existing lighting, in contrast to some photographers who prefer to noticeably overwhelm the scene with their lights.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 10, 2014 0 comments

Whether you find yourself in the wilderness, on a tropical beach, in a river, alongside a pounding waterfall, or on the Arctic tundra, shooting wildlife, scenic views, or the night sky, your tripod must be suited to the task. The practical choices come down to metal/aluminum alloy, composite/carbon fiber, or wood. (Composite materials also include basalt, but we’ll focus on the more popular and widely available carbon fiber in this category.)

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Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 14, 2014 0 comments

(Editor’s Note: Shutterbug contributor Jack Neubart has been testing the new Nikon D810 pro digital SLR. Here’s his hands-on “first look” at the camera. His full review of the D810 will appear in an upcoming issue of Shutterbug magazine.)

I became a Nikon convert back when the D300 was first introduced in 2007. I appreciated the camera’s handling, but mostly they got me with the Creative Lighting System, or CLS. Specifically, on the D300 it was the fully integrated wireless Commander mode via the built-in flash that grabbed my attention.

Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 02, 2014 0 comments

Some photographers develop a trademark style over time. Markku Lahdesmaki had a feel for what he was doing early on. Shooting tongue-in-cheek came naturally, as did making his subjects feel comfortable with his vision for the shot. And clients loved it, enough so that they beckoned him to return to his native Finland from England, where he was living and working with his wife.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 08, 2014 0 comments

The goal in HDR (High Dynamic Range) imaging is to recapture the full tonal range that you saw in the scene, despite dynamic range limitations of the camera sensor. Previously, HDR technique generally involved use of a tripod: now, while it is still advisable, it may become an option. It also required a static scene totally devoid of movement. Any movement resulted in misalignment and ghosting, or secondary images, caused by a shift in camera position or of moving objects from frame to frame.

Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 08, 2014 Published: Jun 01, 2014 0 comments

“I don’t have a favorite location. I just like the challenge of where I go and what I’m presented with on any given assignment,” advertising photographer Brian Bailey declares. One assignment lasting 10 days took Bailey to the Galapagos Islands, for a sunglasses company. But many assignments involve anything but sun-drenched conditions. In fact, the road to this point was a rocky one—of sorts…

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