Jon Canfield

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Jon Canfield Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

As the price of wide format photo printers like the ones offered by Epson, Canon, and HP continues to come down, more and more digital photo enthusiasts are adding them to their digital darkrooms. For less than $400, you can now print photo quality 11x14" images (actually, up to 13x19), saving money and time without sending these prints out to a photo lab.

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Jon Canfield Posted: Feb 01, 2010 0 comments

The following is an excerpt from “Camera Raw 101: Better Photos with Photoshop, Elements, and Lightroom” by Jon Canfield. This is a revision of the popular introductory book on using Adobe Camera Raw and is updated to include all of the new Raw image-processing features in Photoshop CS4 and Elements 7. Because the Raw-processing features are identical in Photoshop CS4 and Lightroom 2...

Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Epson is really pushing the limits with desktop scanners, bringing near drum-scanner quality down to the sub-$800 price range. With two new scanners on display at PMA, Epson had the major news in this category. First up is the Perfection V700 PHOTO. With an estimated price of $549.99, the scanner uses Epson's Dual Lens optics. The Dual Lens System automatically selects...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

One of the most frequent questions I'm asked is about the proper, or "best," way to sharpen images for printing or web use. Almost everyone has struggled with getting this right. Software has improved greatly over the past couple of years, both within Adobe's Photoshop, which recently added the Smart Sharpen filter, and with third-party tools like...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Monitor calibration has become fairly mainstream over the past few years. Nearly everyone knows they should be calibrating their displays, and a fair percentage of them are actually doing it. And, with the cost and ease of use down into the normal (e.g., non-geek) level, there is really no reason to not calibrate your display.

Display calibration is important in...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

The Epson UltraChrome K3-series printers are a well-known and popular choice for many digital photographers who are looking for quality prints with a good archival life. So when Epson asked if I'd like to take a look at their newest line-up, I was very interested in seeing what they had done.

The UltraChrome K3 ink set is pigment based, with a total of nine inks:...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2010 1 comments

Among digital photographers who are looking for quality prints with a good archival life, odds are that you’ll hear the Epson name mentioned, including the 13” R2880 and 17” and larger Stylus Pro printers. The Epson line is known for excellent quality output on a variety of media types, as well as a long archival life through their pigment inks. Recently, Epson added two new...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

When Pantone introduced huey about a year ago, the device was noteworthy for a couple of reasons. The first was the price. At well under $100, it was clearly targeted to the more casual user than previous offerings had been. The huey was also one of the easiest calibration devices to use, and the only one that supported automatic adjustments for ambient light changes.
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Jon Canfield Posted: Nov 20, 2012 Published: Oct 01, 2012 1 comments
I’ve been a long-time user of Wacom graphic tablets as part of my editing workflow. Making selections, painting a mask, and many other operations are not only more intuitive with a pen, but you have much finer control than you do with a mouse or trackpad. Until now, the Intuos4 Wireless tablet with Bluetooth has been what I considered to be as close to perfect as you could get. Used either left- or right-handed, I can have it plugged in via USB or use with Bluetooth when traveling or when I need to be a bit further from the computer, as when I’m teaching a workshop. When Wacom announced the Intuos5, I was curious as to what could possibly be improved upon from the current model, so I was anxious to take a look.
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Jon Canfield Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Most serious digital photographers know that using a graphic tablet is the best way by far when it comes to editing and making selections in Photoshop and other imaging applications. There is a learning curve when switching from a mouse to a pen, but after using one I don't know of any photographers who would go back to the old method. Along with the finer control you have...

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