Jon Canfield

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Jon Canfield Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

What happens when you go back to the drawing board and redesign a successful product? If you were to base your answer on some of the movie sequels that have come out, the results would not be good. Thankfully, Pantone ColorVision has avoided the Hollywood syndrome and come out with a real winner. The recently introduced new version of the popular Spyder hardware calibration system...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

By far the most expensive component of printing your own digital images is the cost of consumables--ink and paper. There are plenty of paper options out there that range from very reasonable to extremely expensive, and I'll take a look at these in a future column. With paper, you're kind of stuck with paying for the type and look you want. Ink, however, is a...

Jon Canfield Posted: May 26, 2015 0 comments

Sometimes a straight photograph isn’t the goal when we capture images. Thanks to a number of programs, you can take your photograph beyond the ordinary and turn it into a work of art with a few clicks of the mouse. One such program is Topaz Simplify (www.topazlabs.com, $39.99). Running standalone or as a plug-in for Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom or Apple’s Aperture, Simplify has a number of presets ranging from cartoon look to wood carvings to help you get started. Additionally, if you create your own look, you can save it as a preset and share those presets with other users.

Jon Canfield Posted: Sep 06, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 0 comments

One of the most common complaints about digital imaging is the lack of consistency when going from one device to another—most commonly screen to print. Dark prints are the typical complaint, but color shifts are also a contributor to choice language and lack of hair. Yes, we tweak the image until the sky is that perfect hue of blue, or the skin tones have just the right amount of warmth and vibrancy. When it’s all done, the image is posted online or printed and it looks nothing like what we expected. The image is too dark, skin tones are too red, any number of problems. Where did it go wrong?

 

In almost all cases, the culprit is an uncalibrated display. Back when CRT displays were the common screen type, color could be wildly different and it was usually pretty easy to detect when the display was at fault. With modern LCD displays that isn’t necessarily the case—color is often close to correct in hue, but luminance, or brightness, is where the problem usually lies.

Jon Canfield Posted: Oct 01, 2010 0 comments

“The Spyder3Express is the latest incarnation of Datacolor’s monitor calibration hardware. It does one thing—calibrate your display—and does it well.”...

Jon Canfield Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

Three years ago, Epson brought out a solid 13x19” printer using the new UltraChrome K3 inks. This model, the R2400, was a major improvement over the 2200 it replaced, thanks to the additional gray inks and a new Advanced Black and White mode in the printer driver. Three years is nearly forever in the digital market, and people have been wondering when a replacement would come and what...

Jon Canfield Posted: Apr 01, 2010 0 comments

Epson’s 17” Stylus Pro 3800 has been one of the most popular printers in its size for the past three years. With a good combination of price and size, this C-sized printer has filled the needs of photographers looking for the ability to print 17x22” on a variety of media without the bulk or expense of a large format printer.

 

Since the introduction of the 3800, Epson has...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

It seems easy to create a black and white from a digital image. At its most basic level all that is required is selecting “Convert to Grayscale,” which is found in almost every image-editing program on the market.

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

If you maintain all your own images you have more freedom in how to go about tagging these photos for future reference.

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

To help make this as easy as possible, it’s helpful to follow a few guidelines for organizing your images.

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