Stan Trzoniec

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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Jan 28, 2014 Published: Dec 01, 2013 1 comments
When photographing animals on an African safari, sharp photos are a gift to bring home and it all centers on proper technique. Use the “sweet spot” on the lens; with both of my shorter lenses it was around f/5.6 or f/8. On the longer zoom, I found f/5 or f/5.6 gave me needle-sharp and distortion-free images. With the animal at rest, always put that focusing spot on the eye. On longer distances or perhaps with the animal moving, place that spot on the shoulder or flank to keep a decent depth of field throughout their length.
Stan Trzoniec Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

My first macro lens was the popular Nikon 60mm Micro-Nikkor. Good move, I thought, as the 60mm focal length could double as an all-purpose lens for a variety of assignments. Trouble is, when I started to get into more and more 1:1 (life-size) work, I only had 21/2" of working space between the front of the lens and my subject. The 105mm was next, sharp as a tack but again...

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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Jun 08, 2015 0 comments

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: everyone has their favorite lens and in my pack, you will always find one in the 400mm variety. To wit, I have Nikon’s newer Nikkor 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6 G ED VR, the 200-400mm f/4 G ED VR and the standard-bearer of them all: the prime Nikkor 400mm f/2.8 AF-S lens. Before that, I had a few of the pre-set, manual focus 400’s but when the Nikon F4 was introduced, the game really changed, especially when it came to wildlife or other land moving objects. I was hooked.

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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Jul 18, 2014 Published: Jun 01, 2014 0 comments

Considering that this opticis only a tad slower than the Nikkor 200-400mm f/4, with a drop of a stop when you zoom out, has a 5x zoom range, is lighter, and costs about half of the near $7000 price tag of the 200-400mm f/4, it is certainly worthy of consideration for those who can appreciate what it has to offer in both range and versatility.

Stan Trzoniec Posted: Aug 01, 2004 0 comments

For Nikon, 1996 was an exciting year. That was the introduction date of the F5 camera that revolutionized the way handheld cameras would be used. It was also the year that true Silent Wave Technology was brought on-line in the form of the 300, 500, and...

Stan Trzoniec Posted: Aug 01, 2001 0 comments

Picking up a Nikon 300mm f/2.8 for the first time was certainly a humbling experience. This lens was not only large in physical size, it was heavy! Specifications show that it checked in at around 51/2 lbs and measured almost a foot in...

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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Aug 01, 2010 1 comments

Nikon’s entry into past universal 80-200mm f/2.8 lenses started back in 1978 with a manual focus, push-pull lens checking in at 4 lbs. Ten years later the autofocus model arrived sporting ED (Extra-low Dispersion) glass; ’92 marked the “D” package. In ’96 the AF-S version came along, followed by the new generation of front motor drive “G” models. Now we...

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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Jul 01, 2010 0 comments

No matter how light you pack, you always feel like you could add just one more item. Knowing photographers, if you can take it, you will. If you plan your trip correctly, you will save weight and not only make your outing a success, but be more mobile and comfortable as well.

With that in mind, let’s look at some “ounce saving” tips. Your...

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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Jul 20, 2011 Published: Jun 01, 2011 1 comments
Brute horsepower, large diesel engines pulling thousands of tons of freight, heavy plumes of exhaust pouring from their stacks, sand being put down on the rails for traction, and the rumble of steel wheels passing by—all are part of the American railroad scene. For both the novice and advanced photographer, the challenge of capturing the drama of moving trains and finding suitable locations is all part of the excitement.
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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Jul 01, 2005 0 comments

Photographers, by nature, love accessories. But sooner or later we all have to face the fact that we can only carry so much equipment. When I go out I go through a mental check list and include the basic equipment that I've outlined in this article. Please keep in mind this is my personal list; vary yours to suit the terrain, subject, and distance covered.

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