Frances E. Schultz
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The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz Sep 01, 2005 14 comments

After looking at the prints I had just given her, my neighbor Genevieve said, "I have never seen prints of these photographs before."

It all started when she showed me a box of 6x4.5cm glass plates from 1923-'35. It was a collection of family photos of her father, aunt, and uncle when they were small children. In France glass plates were used for far...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz May 01, 2002 1 comments

One of the never-ending
fascinations of darkroom work is the way in which you can manipulate your
images. Two effects in particular, softening and vignetting, can give
you lovely, vintage looking pictures with a minimum of effort. Both tend
to...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz Nov 01, 2005 2 comments

The way the battle lines are drawn, you might think that all photographers are committed exclusively to silver halide or exclusively to digital and n'er the twain shall meet. It isn't so. In reality the twain have met. More and more photographers weave seamlessly between the two without a thought. It's only the die-hards in each camp that refuse to acknowledge...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz May 01, 2005 1 comments

Photos © 2004, Frances E. Schultz, All Rights Reserved

How brown do you like your toast? The answer, of course, is "It depends." What kind of bread is it? How old is the bread? How thick? What are you going to put on it? How are you feeling at the time? You can't make hard and fast rules, even for yourself. It's even harder to make toast for...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz Jun 01, 2004 0 comments

Wrinkles or character lines? Few people want their portraits to show every line on their face. The camera may not...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz Feb 01, 2005 3 comments

Many people seem to believe that darkroom chemicals have a fixed capacity, beyond which they stop working. This is quite a long way from the truth. The life of most chemical baths used in the darkroom can be divided into four stages. First, there is the fresh bath, with full vigor. Second, there is the partially exhausted bath, which still works but takes longer. Third, there is...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz Dec 01, 2004 4 comments

The easy way to make a great print is to start out with a great negative. In theory, it's not that difficult to learn to make great negatives. Each film you shoot and process, you learn a little more about how to get closer to the perfect negative. But there are two large, active flies in this particular ointment. One is that you don't want to throw away all your old...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz Dec 01, 2003 1 comments

What is the use of having an old-fashioned, "wet" black and white darkroom in the 21st century? Well, it's a bit like religion. If you have to ask the question, you'll never understand the answer. Anyone who loves darkroom knows the...

35mm Cameras, Lenses
Frances E. Schultz Jan 01, 2006 4 comments

If a picture is really brilliant, you don't have to worry about grain or sharpness or anything else: to quote Mike Gristwood, late of Ilford, "How much good would it do you to know the technical details of any one of Henri Cartier-Bresson's pictures?"

By the same token, if a picture is really bad, no amount of technical brilliance is going...

Show Reports
Frances E. Schultz Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

Good news from Ilford made this PMA a shot in the arm for zanyone who loves the craft of photography and photographic printing. As most people know, in August 2004, Ilford Imaging UK Ltd. had gone into receivership. For months, rumors had been flying about a management buyout, and it finally succeeded just hours before the PMA show opened. The new company will trade as Ilford...