Frances E. Schultz

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Mar 08, 2013 Published: Feb 01, 2013 2 comments
“Not your father’s camera bag” was how Tenba described the prototypes of their new Vector line at photokina 2010. Now, in 2012, the new line is in production, and they were absolutely right. What are the differences? Color, style, and function. A report like this is no place for detail: that’s what manufacturers’ websites are for, and besides, a full, detailed list of new camera bags could more than fill the whole magazine. What I want to do is to give you some idea of the way that bags are heading.
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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Nov 01, 2004 0 comments

A 50th anniversary is something very special: a golden anniversary, which is a good trick for something made of silver, is what Kodak Tri-X celebrates this year. The first of the X-films was Panatomic-X in 1938. Two-thirds of a century later, there's some doubt about what the X was for: probably "Extra," as it was faster and sharper and finer grained than the...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Sep 01, 2004 1 comments

If you enjoy black and white photography you might question whether you need a traditional darkroom at all. Maybe you would be happier shooting black and white with a digital camera, and printing digitally. But many...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Looking at the latest camera bag offerings has an extra piquancy when you are in the market for a bag yourself, as I was at this year's PMA. My husband Roger Hicks had just bought a new laptop, which was a very tight fit indeed in his existing camera bag. We needed something new. We ended up with the CompuTrekker AW backpack from Lowepro--but along the way, I was...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

Fundamental Accessories For Every Photographer
Everyone has to carry their equipment, and a good bag makes it easier to work quickly and efficiently, and saves your back, neck, and arms from unnecessary discomfort. It therefore follows that although bags are sometimes seen as unexciting, they are of fundamental importance.

When you are climbing...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Dec 01, 2002 0 comments

Bags and Cases

If I were to mention every pouch and bag for digital cameras, I could fill the next three issues of Shutterbug, and I must admit that after a while they all blend together. Only a few stand out in my mind, and they tend to be the really well made leather pouches or bags.

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jun 01, 2002 0 comments

To detail all the new bags that are introduced at a single show would take up at least one issue of Shutterbug, so what follows is a brief (believe it or not), alphabetical review of the highlights at PMA, with a small rant by way of preface. If you want more information on introductions not described...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jul 01, 2006 1 comments

You might think that there is not much scope for innovation in camera tripods. You would be right. After all, the number of legs is fixed (though there are monopods, and there have even been a couple of bipods) and their sole function is to hold a camera on top (though again, some make provision for hanging it underneath). But the truth is that tripods are like James Bond movies.

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Dec 01, 2002 2 comments

Darkroom Products

Every photokina it seems that fewer and fewer companies show new darkroom products. Unlike film, where technology is constantly advancing, darkroom technology is more static. The basic design of the photographic enlarger hasn't changed much since the earliest days...

Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

While digital, as expected, dominated the show, silver-halide materials were still to be found. These included three new films; faster films in single-use cameras; a new 35mm film support to reduce static (and therefore dust); new archival storage materials; the promise of new papers; and even--somewhat to my surprise--a lonely enlarger on one of the Chinese stands.

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