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Joe Farace Posted: Apr 24, 2012 Published: Mar 01, 2012 0 comments
During a portrait session and perhaps to a lesser extent when shooting a wedding, you can control the lighting, background, and subject. During a portrait session, I try to manage everything from the subject’s pose, clothing, and makeup and the resulting photographs tend to be as much a portrait of me as they are of my subject. What often emerges from that control is a style, which is not something I’m conscious about when photographing, but the truth is that over time we all develop a signature way of shooting. The danger is that we keep shooting that same way or different versions of the same shot for the rest of our lives. Any style you develop must grow and change as you learn. Otherwise, what’s the point? As we continue to shoot and learn from experience, and reading magazines like Shutterbug, we start to tweak and improve those results until what emerges is truly a personal style.
Joe Farace Posted: Jan 01, 2006 0 comments

Lots of software filters let you apply a certain look after an image is created and some of them mimic the kind of effects camera filters produce while an image is captured. As much as I love using filter plug-ins, they are really postproduction tools for use after a photograph has been acquired. Camera filters are production tools that let you capture images in many ways that...

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Joe Farace Posted: Apr 01, 2001 0 comments

Making photographs for a model's portfolio involves much more than just using the proper posing and lighting techniques and includes all of the less glamorous and business-oriented aspects of creating these kinds of images. The...

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 27, 2012 Published: Oct 01, 2012 6 comments
Last year I tried a picture-a-day project and was surprised how difficult it was, but also found that it was a great way to stimulate creativity. In 2013, I’ll begin a similar project, this time using Tumblr (www.tumblr.com) because it’s free and the simplest way I know to create a photoblog. To get you inspired, I’ve rounded up four different photo-a-day blogs to show the diverse ways these talented photographers created their sites and blogs. Give it a try because it forces you to think—every day—about making new photographs. And the best way to improve your skills is to practice, practice, practice.
Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2006 0 comments

"Of course, there will always be those who look only at technique, who ask `how,' while others of a more curious nature will ask `why.' Personally, I have always preferred inspiration to information."--Man Ray

ACDSee Pro: Digital Coincidence?
On the same day Adobe Systems announced the public beta of...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

If your camera doesn’t offer Live View you can add it as an accessory.

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 01, 2010 0 comments

“Never say never, for if you live long enough, chances are you will not be able to abide by its restrictions.”—Gloria Swanson

In February I closed my blog and considered closing my Facebook and Flickr pages. Times change though, and several of my colleagues encouraged me to alter those plans, and if there’s anything more wonderful about the web it’s that...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 01, 2001 0 comments

While Kodak's Photo CD process was originally announced in 1990, it wasn't until the summer of 1992 that a photo lab in my area offered the service. The original concept behind Photo CD was at once simple and complex. The...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2006 6 comments

Photographing a cake can be art.
--Irving Penn

Although I am probably better known for eating cakes than photographing them, my late brother Michael Farace not only photographed cakes that were delicious examples of edible art, he baked them as well. You can see some of these delightful examples of sugar art in his book Cakes by Design, co-authored with...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 21, 2013 Published: Apr 01, 2013 3 comments
Nicholas Carr, author of The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains, reports that a study of online retailing in 2006 found that a third of online shoppers with broadband connections abandoned a site if its pages took 4 seconds or longer to load; two-thirds quit when the delay reached 6 seconds. Recent studies by Google and Microsoft found that people abandon a site with a page loading delay of 250 milliseconds. If, as is becoming common in some photographers’ web design, there is a prelude before your real content launches or your server is slow, it does not bode well for increasing the number of visitors to your site.

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