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Jason Schneider Posted: May 01, 2010 0 comments

The first digital Leica M with a full-frame, 24x36mm sensor (active area 23.9x35.8mm), the M9 offers 18-megapixel capture and unrestricted coverage with nearly the entire range of Leica lenses past and present, including extreme wide angles.


Perhaps even more important, the M9’s exclusive 18-megapixel CCD, developed by Kodak with input from Leica, has addressed the foibles that...

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George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2010 2 comments

If you want to test the mettle of a camera intended to satisfy a craven need for speed, take that camera to a hockey game, one of the world’s fastest sports. That’s one of the tests to which I put the Nikon D3S, a brute of a camera that seems to adapt to any shooting or lighting conditions with ease. The D3S is the latest in Nikon’s pro line of D-SLRs, priced for pros (list:...

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George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2010 1 comments

The Sony Alpha A550 (with kit 18-55mm lens, $1049 list; body only, $949 list) takes us another step forward with in camera processing of HDR and DRO functions. While these items, to me, are the headliners for this camera, other camera amenities add to its allure. These include an articulating monitor, two Live View modes, very good high ISO results, a fast 5 fps (frames per second) shooting rate...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2010 1 comments

The new 1D Mark IV is a step up the evolutionary ladder from EOS Erectus, going where all SLRs are heading these days—High-Definition (HD) video capture.


Video aside, in today’s D-SLR world a $5000 16-megapixel camera might not seem like such a big deal, especially when the 18-megapixel EOS 7D, also with video capture, sells for $1699. The 1D...

George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2010 1 comments

Note From The Editor
Our criteria for doing a test on an integral lens camera is whether or not we think it would be a camera that a seasoned photographer could appreciate and use as a second body to back up a D-SLR, or even as the sole camera on a trip where a D-SLR would be cumbersome or burdensome. The camera in question should have many of—but not all—the...

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Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2010 0 comments

The new EOS 7D fills a gap in Canon’s D-SLR line-up that never existed before, fitting somewhere between the EOS 5D Mark II and EOS 50D; it also goes head-to-head with the Nikon 300S I tested for the January 2010 issue of Shutterbug.

Jack Neubart Posted: Feb 01, 2010 0 comments

Micro Four Thirds format cameras promise of compact size, reduced weight, and versatility approaching a D-SLR. I recently had the opportunity to work with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 to see how it fulfilled those ambitions.

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2010 0 comments

Do you own a point-and-shoot and want to step up your image potential? If you are inclined to agree with these queries you might consider the Nikon D3000.

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2010 1 comments

Much has been made of the difference in image quality between so-called full-frame and APS-C-sized sensors.

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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 01, 2010 0 comments

When Nikon launched the all-new entry-level D3000, they took the time to freshen the D300 with—what else—video capability, adding the “s” suffix, as is their naming habit.

Joe Farace Posted: Jan 01, 2010 1 comments

The original Olympus Pen was introduced in 1959 and was the first Japanese half-frame 35mm camera produced. Its name? Designer Maitani’s concept was that the camera would be as convenient to carry as a pen.

Jon Canfield Posted: Jan 01, 2010 1 comments

Panasonic is one of the primary supporters of the Four Thirds format system that utilizes a standard sensor and lens mount that allow you to use lenses from other companies supporting the format, including Olympus and Sigma.

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 01, 2009 0 comments

Beginning with the launch of the Asahiflex I in 1952, Pentax (PENTAprism refleX) was the first SLR that incorporated a penta-prism viewfinder and reflex mirror.

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2009 1 comments

Sony is not shy about who this new D-SLR is designed for—those seeking to step up from point-and-shoot digicams into the land of interchangeable lenses and easy application of creative controls.

Ron Eggers Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

Some of the most interesting new cameras are extended zoom models, lightweight units that have extremely long-range zoom lenses that make it possible to use a small camera to capture a distant subject. Extended zooms fall into two broad categories: compact models with 10- to 12-megapixel sensors and zoom ranges around 10-12x, which can fit into a pocket or purse, and slightly larger cameras...