Talking Pictures

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Dec 11, 2015 0 comments

He lives in a historic California gold-mining town about an hour out of San Diego, so the props for Ed Masterson’s Old West images are easy to come by: a barrel borrowed from a nearby winery, a pistol from a friend’s gun collection, a book from an antique shop, weathered wood from old barns nearby, and so on.

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 04, 2016 0 comments

Sports shooters live for moments of key action; they also cherish players’ reactions to those moments. Mike Corrado caught the latter at the start of the third game of the World Series, as New York Mets pitcher Noah Syndergaard sent a message to Kansas City Royals leadoff hitter Alcides Escobar, who is known for crowding the plate and swinging at first pitches.

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jan 26, 2016 0 comments

The scene is often just the starting point of a Deborah Sandidge photograph. “It’s visualization,” she says. “I’m looking at a scene and imagining what’s going to happen over time.” What was going to happen at the San Antonio, Texas, River Walk was the continuing passage of the water taxis. Sandidge knew they were the key to an expressive, dramatic photograph, one that would get as close as possible to picturing the passage of time.

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jun 21, 2016 0 comments

David X. Tejada’s assignment was a lighting demo for a how-to video and end-use images. The location was a private home where he was asked to create the effect of artificial sunlight. The weather cooperated by providing rain.

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Staff Posted: May 21, 2013 Published: Apr 01, 2013 1 comments
This King Penguin chick, warm in his downy “fur coat,” didn’t seem to mind the snow, cold, or gray skies, but he plaintively called for his parents hoping to be fed. Larger than either parent he seemed to be well cared for, but his full-throated calls and beseeching body language made it clear that he wanted his parents and food now. It’s hard to make your voice heard among so many thousands I’m sure, but it made us smile. He has more in common with human children than he knows.
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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Dec 20, 2012 Published: Nov 01, 2012 11 comments
In the fall of 2011 my wife and I traveled to the Charlevoix region of Quebec known for its spectacular autumn foliage. Unfortunately, the weather was uncooperative with heavy rain, dark clouds, and high winds.

Disappointed but undeterred, I pocketed my Fuji X100 to explore the local vibrant artistic community. I came across the veranda of a local artist’s boutique and my mood immediately improved. The whimsical and creative display with the “Commedia dell’Arte” surreal theme reminded me of children playing joyfully in the rain.

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 29, 2016 0 comments

BMX rider Daniel Coriz comes in at speed from the right side, launches himself up 10 feet, touches both tires, pulls the handlebars to pop a wheelie off the wall, then turns the bike for a clean exit. He lands a foot in front of adventure sports photographer Michael Clark, who’s been hand-holding his camera, tracking and firing to capture every turn and twist of the trick.

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 26, 2015 0 comments

As he neared the end of the process of making prints for an exhibition of his large- and medium-format photography, Geoffrey Roberts was ready to spread the word about the upcoming event. “I was in the darkroom once or twice a week for eight or nine months leading up to the show,” he says, “and to promote it I took pictures in the darkroom and posted them to Flickr, Facebook, Instagram—basically everywhere.”

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Staff Posted: Jan 09, 2012 Published: Nov 01, 2011 57 comments
While in Kenya on business I visited the Nairobi Railway Museum, home to a variety of fantastic and rare trains from the Colonial Era, including the famed Lunatic Express. Yet little effort, if any, was made to preserve these historic treasures as they silently deteriorated in the equatorial heat and humidity. I spotted this one rusting train engine bearing the fallen Masai of Kenya nameplate (painted in Masai red) and thought it summed up the state of the museum quite well.
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Staff Posted: Oct 11, 2012 Published: Sep 01, 2012 1 comments
After a long morning shoot throughout Death Valley National Park my wife and I found ourselves at Furnace Creek at the Borax Museum. She was intent on going inside the museum but I spotted old equipment outside that previously had been used in mining operations. Being a strict nature photographer I am normally not attracted to architectural venues or mechanical subjects. But on further examination I found the afternoon light to be pleasing, casting interesting contrasts between the illuminated equipment and shadows. I was particularly attracted to this old rusty train locomotive, one of two engines previously used in Death Valley on the narrow-gauge railroad extant during the borax mining era.

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Staff Posted: Feb 22, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 5 comments
While visiting the small island of Kökar in the Åland archipelago in Finland, I found this weathered fishing boat. This old boat tells a story of many years ago when herring fishing on Kökar was in its prime. No longer in use, the boat reminds us of the rich history of the island when hardy fishermen led courageous lives on the sea. Photographing the boat in early morning light, I was able to capture the nuances of its story. Since my ancestors originated from here, the boat gave a glimpse into my own history.
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Staff Posted: Aug 23, 2012 Published: Jul 01, 2012 2 comments
While enjoying an afternoon coffee break at a Parisian café, I was engulfed by the fantasy world of the city itself as I heard the sounds of traffic mingling with the footsteps of people passing by.

In my mind, the image still evokes a heady sense of “joie de la vie” (the joy of life)…and one can never get enough joy in life.
—K. Preiss
Wake Forest, NC

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Oct 25, 2016 0 comments

Russell Hart wasn’t surprised by the collections he found in his mother’s home as he prepared it for sale. “She had a hard time letting go of things,” he says. “She saw practical value in some, sentimental value in others.”

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 23, 2012 Published: Apr 01, 2012 14 comments

In 1987, my friends Julie and Jim bought the 12-room, three-story Victorian in which they’ve raised their daughters, Megan and Emily. Early on they researched the house and the Connecticut mill town in which it’s located. They found maps that indicated the house had been built between 1870 and 1875; town records revealed much of the chronology of ownership. Over the years they renovated the kitchen and one of the bathrooms, stripped layers of paint from woodwork and doors, replaced wallpaper and made restorations and repairs. They came to realize that the original floor plan of the house was pretty much intact, though there seemed to be some changes they couldn’t quite figure out. And Julie, Jim, Megan, and Emily—they like to figure things out. Often they thought, if only there were photographs of the old house.

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Oct 13, 2015 0 comments

The race was more joy than suspense. American Pharoah had already taken the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes, and he led the 2015 Belmont Stakes from the start and was never challenged. Early on, racing fans at Belmont Park were pretty sure they were going to see the first Triple Crown winner in 37 years.

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