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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jul 01, 2007 Published: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

New digicams now offer higher resolution, larger LCD screens, longer zoom lenses, more compact body size, greater speed, and some other amenities that I'll discuss in this report. And the megapixel race has not really slowed as we had expected a year ago. Apparently, some consumers are not satisfied with 6- or 7-megapixel (MP) resolution, making the ultrahigh-resolution...

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Apr 13, 2006 0 comments

New gold CD-Rs and DVDs that are said to extend the storage life of data, music
and images for many decades are being introduced by KMP Media, LLC of Rochester,
NY. Operating under trademark license from Eastman Kodak Company, KMP Media
is marketing them as the KODAK Preservation CD-R and the KODAK Preservation
DVD (-R).


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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Oct 29, 2004 0 comments

The Digipro F is the newest member of Gossen's family of high quality exposure meters for digital and analog photography. The new exposure meter handles
both flash and ambient light and features a swivel head that will make measuring
and reading much easier. It's lightweight enough to sit comfortably in
a shirt pocket while maintaining a user-friendly interface, which can be operated
using a single hand.


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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

Hawk Mountain Papers, creators of quality, archival inkjet paper, has redesigned
their website for greater ease of use. Customers can search for paper by thickness,
brightness, or what type of printing being conducted. Hawk Mountain's selection
of paper is available in various sized sheets and rolls.

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Sep 26, 2006 0 comments

Continuing its courtship of professional and advanced amateur photographers
who wish to make their own prints, Hp has announced the amateur-oriented 8350,
an A3 (13x19) size, 6-ink printer, and two new large format DesignJet printers,
models 2100 and 3100, both of which are available in 24 in and 44 in models.
The difference is that the 2100 is an 8-ink printer and the Z3100 is a 12-ink


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Press Release Posted: Oct 15, 2012 3 comments
ILFORD has unveiled the latest fine art inkjet papers to join its growing top-of-the-line range of GALERIE Prestige media. Crafted to meet the needs of fine art professionals, the new line-up features surfaces that can stand up to any exacting artistic vision while ensuring vivid, archival-quality image rendition for portfolios, prints-for-sale, as well as gallery and museum-quality prints. More detail is available on the ILFORD website at

GALERIE Prestige Gold Mono Silk
GALERIE Prestige Gold Mono Silk is a true black and white media for inkjet printers, allowing photographers specializing in monochrome photography to achieve inkjet prints reminiscent of those they developed in the traditional darkroom era. The paper has an acid-free and lignin-free fibre base which simulates the structure of a traditional silver halide black and white photographic paper. Backed by over 130 years of imaging excellence and know how in both digital and analogue printing, ILFORD has blended the two mediums to offer this step forward in digital imaging technology.

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Sep 27, 2007 0 comments

Less than a year ago the MAC Group launched the Induro brand of professionally
designed, high performance support gear to the US market. Now, the MAC Group is
pleased to announce Not only does the new Induro site offer
complete product specifications, product benefits and a whole host of the more
expected features -- there is an interactive product search, an interactive
camera compatibility search, and a user search engine.

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Press Release Posted: May 25, 2011 1 comments

Discontinued in 2008, the legendary Polaroid 600 color film is difficult to find and sorely missed by millions of photographers. Impossible now fills this colorless void just in time for the most colorful season and proudly introduces a new generation instant color film. Presented in a limited First Flush Edition, the PX 680 Color Shade film brings color back to all Polaroid 600 cameras and introduces a magical new color palette within the classic white frame.

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Mar 14, 2008 0 comments

Summit, NJ February 18, 2008: On April 4-6, 2008, the Visual Arts Center of New
Jersey will host the largest Photographic Educational Conference in the state.
Utilizing the Art Center's state-of-the-art facility, an exciting weekend
of workshops, speakers, portfolio reviews as well as a vendor fair is planned.
Workshops presented at the conference will run the gamut from camera and light
fundamentals to fine art printing and scanning. Lectures will be given by some
of the leading names in the industry including George Tice and Stephen Perloff.
Participants choose only the Workshops, Speeches, Panel Discussions, and Portfolio
Reviews that they are interested in attending. The cost to attend two workshops
is $45. To view the conference schedule, workshop listings, instructor biographies
and to register, visit

On Friday April 4th from 7- 9 PM, participants will be able to listen to keynote
speaker, Stephen Perloff, founder and editor of Photo Review Magazine. His lecture,
Photographic Truth in the Digital Age, addresses how we view reality and truthfulness
in photography when, through digital advancement, images can so easily be manipulated.

On Saturday, the conference is running workshops, lectures and portfolio reviews
utilizing the Art Center's nine art studios. The day will culminate in a
lively panel discussion on contemporary issues in photography including panelists
from all segments of the industry moderated by George Schaub, editor of Shutterbug
Magazine. The panel topic is The Image as Information: Where Does That Lead Us?
Panelists include Ted Harris, Editor, View Camera Magazine; Joel M. Smith, Curator
of Photography, Princeton University Art Museum; Donald Lokuta, Art Professor,
Kean University; and Diana Edkins, Director of Exhibitions and Limited-Edition
Photographs for Aperture Foundation.

A highlight of the conference is a slide lecture and book signing by George Tice,
one of the best known fine-art photographers in the nation. Making photographs
for over 40 years, Mr. Tice's prints are in many museums including the Museum
of Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Metropolitan Museum, where
he had a one-man show in 1972. His photographs have been shown all over the world.
The lecture is scheduled for Saturday, April 5th from 4-6pm. A book signing, which
is open to the public, follows and will end at 6:45PM. This is a rare opportunity
to learn from a master in the photography field and all those interested in attending
should register early to reserve a spot.

Many events taking place at the conference are free to attend. On Sunday April
6th, an exhibitor fair of photography equipment and supply manufacturers will
be opened to the public from 10am-6pm. This day also includes free events such
as darkroom demos, tours and mini workshops by vendors. To become a vendor, contact
Event Producer Nancy Ori at

The mission of the conference is to create a central presence at the Visual Arts
Center of New Jersey for the study and practice of photographic art within the
state. The Art Center is committed to teaching traditional darkroom photography,
an important part of the fine art experience, as well as providing courses in
state-of-the-art digital advances. The Art Center houses digital labs and a traditional
wet darkroom. It offers a wide range of classes, workshops, and open studios.
Visit to view the latest course offerings.

The Visual Arts Center of New Jersey is celebrating its 75th anniversary of "bringing
art and people together." Since its founding in 1933, the Visual Arts Center
of New Jersey has evolved into a major regional art center with a professionally
recognized art school, a critically acclaimed exhibition program and an extensive
community outreach program. In 2003, the Art Center completed a $6.5 million renovation
featuring a nine studio art school with three interior galleries and an outdoor
sculpture park. For further information, please visit the Art Center at

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Mar 04, 2005 1 comments

Kodak Company has announced enhancements to its consumer and professional film
portfolios. Kodak unveiled a number of emulsion improvements to KODAK MAX Versatility
400-speed film, adding more flexibility for clearer, sharper pictures in underexposed
situations, such as low-light and extended flash range conditions. KODAK MAX
Versatility film is said to provide the best skin tone reproduction, fastest
speed, widest latitude, and unsurpassed sharpness and color. The suggested retail
price for Kodak MAX Versatility 400 Film is US$8.99 - US$9.99 MSRP for a four-pack,
varying by retailer. This film will begin to ship in the second quarter of 2005.

Enhanced KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA film features an improved surface coating
technology that delivers increased performance with KODAK DIGITAL ICE technology
and improved scanning with specular light. The new overcoat technology maintains
the excellent scratch resistance of PORTRA films. This improvement applies to
120/220 (medium format) and sheet format films across the entire PORTRA film
family, including 160 and 400-speed NC (natural color) and VC (vivid color)
PORTRA films.


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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Sep 26, 2006 0 comments

Eastman Kodak Company is extending its partnership with Leica Camera AG to
provide image sensors for the newly announced LEICA M8. The new KODAK KAF-10500
image sensor was developed specifically for use with the M8, and marks Kodak's
second collaboration with Leica, building on the success of Kodak's interaction
with Leica on the LEICA DIGITAL-MODULE-R.

The first digital camera to use the Leica viewfinder system, the LEICA M8 extends
the Leica M series into the digital world. By working closely with Leica, Kodak
designed and optimized the new image sensor to meet the demanding needs of Leica

With a resolution of over 10 million pixels, the KAF-10500 continues Kodak's
legacy of offering high performance imaging devices that leverage Kodak's
Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) technology for low noise, high sensitivity, and wide
dynamic range. Utilizing a 6.8µm pixel architecture, the sensor uses an
optimized microlens configuration to maximize center to corner uniformity for
improved image quality, particularly important for the broad incident light
angles associated with M series lenses. The sensor also includes anti-blooming
protection to prevent against image corruption during high light level conditions.

For more information on the KAF-10500 image sensor, visit


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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Jun 22, 2007 0 comments

Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE:EK) has introduced a new image sensor technology
that is said to provides a significant increase in sensitivity to light when
compared to current sensor designs. With this new technology, users will realize
a 2x to 4x increase in sensitivity (from one to two photographic stops), which
will improve performance when taking pictures under low light and reduce motion
blur when imaging moving subjects. In addition, this technology enables the
design of smaller pixels (leading to higher resolutions in a given optical format)
while retaining imaging performance.

This breakthrough advances an existing Kodak technology that has become a standard
in digital imaging. Today, the design of almost all color image sensors is based
on the "Bayer Pattern," an arrangement of red, green, and blue pixels
that was first developed by Kodak Scientist Dr. Bryce Bayer in 1976. In this
design, half of the pixels on the sensor are used to collect green light, with
the remaining pixels split evenly between sensitivity to red and blue light.
After exposure, software reconstructs a full color signal for each pixel in
the final image.

Kodak's new proprietary technology builds on the existing Bayer Pattern
by adding panchromatic, or "clear" pixels to the red, green, and
blue pixels already on the sensor. Since these pixels are sensitive to all wavelengths
of visible light, they collect a significantly higher proportion of the light
striking the sensor. The remaining red, green, and blue pixels are then used
to record the color information of the scene.

To reconstruct a full color image, Kodak has also developed new software algorithms
specifically designed to work with the raw data generated from these new image
sensors. These sophisticated algorithms use the more sensitive panchromatic
pixels to act as the luminance channel of the final image, and derive chrominance
information from the color pixels on the sensor. Leveraging over 30 years of
Kodak image science, these new algorithms support the increased sensitivity
provided by these new pixel patterns, while retaining the overall image quality
and color fidelity required by customers.

Kodak is beginning to work with a number of leading companies to implement this
new technology in system-wide solutions and to streamline the design-in process.

Kodak is developing CMOS sensors using this technology for consumer markets
such as digital still cameras and camera phones. As the technology is appropriate
for use with both CCD and CMOS image sensors, however, its use can be expanded
across Kodak's full portfolio of image sensors, including products targeted
to applied imaging markets such as industrial and scientific imaging. The first
Kodak sensor to use this technology is expected to be available for sampling
in the first quarter of 2008.

For more information on Kodak's entire image sensor product line, please


Filed under
Staff Posted: Sep 10, 2008 0 comments

Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE:EK) continues to champion professional photographers and set new standards in professional film with the new KODAK PROFESSIONAL EKTAR 100 (EKTAR 100) film. This new film, with ISO 100 speed, high saturation and ultra-vivid color, offers the finest, smoothest grain of any color negative film available today.


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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Nov 15, 2007 0 comments

Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE:EK) enhances its black-and-white professional film
portfolio with the introduction of an improved Kodak Professional T-MAX 400 Film.
The new film, utilizing Kodak's patented T-GRAIN emulsions, delivers finer
grain and higher sharpness. T-MAX 400 is said by the company to be the world's
finest grained and the world's sharpest 400-speed black-and-white film,
offering photographers a level of clarity normally only available from a 100-speed

The new T-MAX 400 complements Kodak's full range of black-and-white films.
In addition to T-MAX 400, the portfolio includes:

Filed under
Ron Leach Posted: May 19, 2016 0 comments

Anthropics Technology has unveiled LandscapePro, an easy-to-use, full-featured software package designed to take your photo retouching to the next level. Created specifically for enhancing scenic photography, LandscapePro is available in standalone and Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom and Elements plug-in editions.