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David B. Brooks Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Digital Help is designed to aid you in getting the most from your digital photography, printing, scanning, and image creation. Each month, David Brooks provides solutions to problems you might encounter with matters such as color calibration and management, digital printer and scanner settings, and working with digital photographic images with many different kinds of cameras and...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

There are many different ways to make selections, each making life easier depending on the image and areas you want to define. Here's how I make selections that involve a lot of straight lines:

This picture, taken indoors looking out through large windows is a prime example of backlighting causing underexposure (#1). The fix for it is to select the well-lit outdoor...

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

If you've glanced at the photos and you're not laughing, you might think about skipping ahead to the next story. On these pages we're going to spend some time in the bemusement park that's the mind of Chip Simons, and if the weird light he's shining into the darkness didn't bring at least a smile, you're probably not going to enjoy the...

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Maria Piscopo Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Tony Corbell (www.corbellproductions.com) was one of the first photographers I worked alongside when I started speaking on the photo lecture circuit. When I saw the "lighting" theme for this issue, I knew he would be the one to talk to about business today. Corbell's October appearance at the...

Rosalind Smith Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Fifteen years ago Ann Johansson left Gothenburg, Sweden, and came to America. She was looking for "sunshine" but she may just have found the end of the rainbow. For seven years her real-life job was waitressing in Los Angeles. Her hobby was taking pictures.

"It took me a while to realize you could actually make a living here having a...

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Howard Millard Posted: Sep 27, 2005 0 comments


To
achieve the eerie, glowing effect of infrared black and
white film, I applied several techniques in Adobe Photoshop.

Photos © 2001, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

Are you attracted to the
mysterious, otherworldly glow of black and white infrared film? But
you've heard that it's a bit of a hassle to shoot and print.
Well, here's how to emulate that exotic infrared (IR) look digitally
starting with any color original.



Why not shoot IR film to begin with? Kodak High Speed Infrared film
is a challenge. First, to avoid fogging, it should be stored in the
refrigerator and must be loaded and unloaded in the darkroom or a changing
bag. Then, for the best effect, you must shoot with a deep red or opaque
filter over your lens. Once you've focused, you must re-focus
the lens manually to the infrared focus point. Since your camera meter
doesn't measure IR light, it's advisable to bracket exposures
widely. In the field, you must load and reload your camera in a light-tight
changing bag. After the film has been processed, the negatives are extremely
contrasty and often require extensive dodging and burning to get a good
print.



I
started with this original color 35mm slide shot on Fuji Sensia
II and scanned it on a Polaroid Sprintscan 35 Plus scanner
at 2700dpi for a 26MB file.

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Howard Millard Posted: Sep 27, 2005 0 comments


1

Photos © 2003, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

Adding a reflection of your
subject can double the impact of your digital photo, transforming an
ordinary shot into something memorable and striking. Using tools in
Adobe Photoshop, Elements, and other image-editing programs, it's
not too difficult to double your pixel power. Just follow these nine
steps. I used Photoshop, and the procedure is similar in Elements or
other programs.



2

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 27, 2005 0 comments

The
Sprint PCS Samsung Multimedia Phone MM-A800



Much ado has been made of late of how camera phones will gut the lower-end digicam
market and how everyone will dump their 1-3MP digicams for these amazing multimedia
products. Having shot with a sub 1-megapixel phone a year back I shrugged and
moved on, deciding it was a fun toy that some might find useful but that image
quality was poor, even when compared with the lowliest of blister-pack dedicated
cameras. Word has gotten around that new, higher-megapixel phonecams are coming,
with 7 MP being the figure touted on one model available now overseas. In addition,
we just got word that Kodak is finally going to release their EasyShare One,
subject of a press conference last January, which is said to be a camera first
and then a web or phone connecting pictuire sender second. With all that in
mind I was intrigued by the new Samsung 2MP camphone sent to us by the folks
at Sprint, one that links up with Sprint's PCS Picture mail service.

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Sep 23, 2005 0 comments

Microtek USA is shipping the ScanMaker i800, a high-resolution scanner that
is said to combine professional features, versatility, power and convenience
at a great price. At $399, the unit can handle multiple film sizes including
24 frames of 35mm filmstrips , 12 mounted 35mm slides, two 4" x 5"
transparencies, and medium format up to 6 x 17 cm panoramic. With a maximum
film scanning area of 8" x 12" the i800 accepts large format film
and contact sheets as well. The scanner, which features 4800 x 9600 dpi optical
resolution and a 4.0 Dmax, allows users to create poster-size images from photos
and film. The ScanMaker i800 also features a large 8.5" x 14" reflective
scanning area to accommodate legal-size documents and batch scanning of photos.

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Sep 22, 2005 0 comments

Wacom's new Graphire4 pen tablets are said to provide the tools needed
to have fun editing photos and exploring digital creativity. These new pen tablets
include a patented, cordless, battery-free pen and mouse, a tablet and five
valuable software applications. Using the natural control of the pen and the
included software, it's easy to enhance photos and to create artwork for
scrapbooks, craft projects and slide shows. It's also easy to communicate
more personally by using the pen to digitally jot notes, annotate documents
and sketch quick diagrams. Graphire4 pen tablets are available immediately in
a choice of three colors (Silver, White and Metallic Blue) and two sizes (4x5
and 6x8) which are priced at $99 and $199.

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