Jon Sienkiewicz

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Aug 11, 2013 0 comments
We all know how big a tomato is. If we see a photo of a GIANT tomato sitting all by itself, we have no idea that it’s bigger than its cousins. To convey the perception of size one must position the tomato near another object of known size—say, an egg or a walnut. Same is true about cameras.
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Aug 04, 2013 3 comments
What every photographer should own; add to that list an inexpensive collapsible reflector.
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Jul 28, 2013 0 comments
Sharpen your shooting skills by giving yourself an “assignment.”
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Jul 21, 2013 0 comments
It used to be fun selecting film and developer combinations back in the Dim Ages of Photography, before digital happened. You can enjoy nearly the same experience today by processing images with Alien Skin Exposure 5.
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Jul 13, 2013 1 comments
After one of their most dramatic marketing build-ups in recent times, Leica unveiled the X Vario camera on June 11. I was fortunate to get a working sample—for just a few days—and put it through its paces. Here are my impressions.
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Jul 06, 2013 1 comments
The importance of a comfortable and secure camera strap is often taken too lightly. If you’re serious about your straps, check these out
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Jun 29, 2013 1 comments
The only thing better than owning a high-end compact camera is owning two of the same model. At the risk of sounding extravagant or greedy, let me explain.
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Jun 20, 2013 1 comments
Shooting Soho with a Yellow Camera.
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Oct 16, 2012 Published: Sep 01, 2012 21 comments
It’s a good thing that early photographers didn’t have to pass through airport security with their flash equipment. The pyrotechnics they used to light a scene would surely have merited more than a pat down. Many years ago, long before the flash tube or flashbulb, a century or so before the Flashcube, cameramen used a flash powder called thermite.
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Feb 17, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 1 comments
When Olympus and Panasonic launched the Micro Four Thirds system they offered adapters that enabled the use of regular Four Thirds lenses. Smart move, because it immediately expanded the library of available glass. The goal of Micro Four Thirds is smaller and lighter SLR cameras. The unanticipated benefit is compatibility with tons of lenses we all thought we’d never use again.

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