George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

Gone are the days when we might be discussing the merits of stock vs. dilution ratios for film processing and the uses of potassium ferricyanide for snapping up highlights on prints. While these are still items of interest for those working in the chemical darkroom, the talk these days is more about raw image converters and which plug-ins are optimum for gaining a "Velvia...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

Those who have been around for a while have to be amused by the occasional proclamation that another black and white renaissance has occurred. This pronouncement from industry wags is made every few years to usher in another glorious age for black and white photographers and printers. This time around the gushing is around new inkjet papers, dubbed "exhibition quality"...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

Mac users can use Aperture to attain good foundation monochrome images from digital camera and scanned RGB files. Because Aperture treats the original raw file as sacrosanct, and works in Versions from what it dubs the Master, many options can be explored before exporting the file to image-manipulation software for further refinement. As with any conversion software, I suggest...

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

Two things have changed in determining the best bag for lugging around gear while traveling by plane--the type of gear a photographer travels with and the airline restrictions on carryon gear. These days there seems to be a need for more space for accessories required than actual camera and lens, what with more and more photographers traveling with laptops, card readers...

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

As someone who has paid the rent with photography since high school I often find myself uncomfortable when the words "photography" and "art" are linked in a sentence, especially when art is spelled with a capital "A." I see photography as a craft, one that takes rigor, training, and sacrifice to get right. But I also see photography as an art;...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

Last year we reported that Fujifilm had promised to be the "last man standing" when it came to maintaining and introducing new films, and we are happy to report that their promise has been kept. With a recently introduced Fujichrome Provia 400 and a return of Fujichrome Velvia 50, the company continues to upgrade its chrome film line with new emulsions that improve...

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George Schaub Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

Billed as a "large wheeled camera/computer case," the Pelican 283 (for short) can carry all your gear, and more, in a clever design that holds more than you could imagine in a carryon, wheeled case. In truth, when the entire bag is "together," it can be difficult to stow into an above-seat bin, my main criteria for a bag these days, and in fact the case is...

George Schaub Posted: Nov 01, 2007 Published: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

Common wisdom is what the collective mind creates to make sense of the world. It is a pool of "givens" based on experience and assumptions about how things work. While many aspects of the new Canon EOS 40D are evolutionary rather than a startling breakthrough, in other ways it creates a "new normal" that goes against some common wisdom we might share about...

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George Schaub Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

To get a handle on the issue at hand we first have to define a "pro photographer." In the simplest terms, a professional is someone who makes money at what they do. But pros can also have another day job entirely, or do the odd photographic job on nights and weekends to help pay the rent. Indeed, many pro photographers started working for nothing or next to nothing...

George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

If you run down the specs of the Nikon D40x D-SLR and compare them with the D40 you'll not find many differences. This is essentially the D40 with 4.1 more megapixels on the same size sensor and the ability to use ISO 100, rather than the ISO 200 lower limit on the D40. (To see the D40 review and specs visit www.shutterbug.com and type Nikon D40 into the Search box.) The...

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