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George Schaub Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

The Canon Digital Rebel series draws on a long tradition of Rebel cameras, going back to the 35mm SLR days, with cameras that were always companionable, easy to use, lightweight, and "simplified" for the general user. That simplification does not mean unsophisticated; to get simple to work there has to be lots of tech in the background. That was true with the Rebel...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Created chiefly for the high-end Nikon D300 and D3, the new 24mm PC (Perspective Control) lens from Nikon can also be used on other Nikon D-SLR cameras, such as the relatively new D60 on which I tested it, albeit with some loss of full automation and functionality. Being a manual focus lens it can also mount on most Nikon film SLRs as well; being a PC lens it is unique in both...

George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Combining backpack carrying qualities and roomy storage with sling-like bag accessibility to gear, the Lowepro Fastpack 250 ($119 MSRP) adds the modern necessity of a safe and padded laptop storage area as well. Lightweight yet sturdy, the bag has ample shoulder straps and side pockets, plus a back support belt and strap for added security and comfort. Divided into two...

George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Small, 4x6 dye sub prints have their uses, for quick prints of snapshots, for making thumbnail contact sheets from a memory card or CD, or even printing out smaller images on sheet cards for passport, bus pass, or ID cards. They become personal photo kiosks, if you will, making trips down to the store unnecessary when you just want a quick print from your image files. They also...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

It goes without saying that digital has changed lots of things in photography. One matter that requires more thorough investigation is how it affects optics and assumptions we have made about the design, recommendations, and even the naming conventions we use. While this column length does not allow for full discussion I'll raise some of the issues and open the floor to our...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

If you ever want a unique point of view try a "fisheye" lens. Like looking through a door peephole (which in fact is a "fisheye" type) this order of lens sacrifices linear correction in favor of a very wide angle of view. Originally made for creating "full sky" images when pointed straight up, they had long ago been adopted by photographers for...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 24, 2008 Published: Jul 30, 2008 0 comments

The Sigma APO 150-50mm lens is a moderately fast, super-telephoto zoom designed to work with both APS-C and full-frame DSLR cameras. It offers quite useful close focusing (7.2 ft) and two modes of what they deem "optical stabilization" (OS.) Weighing in at 67.4 oz you always know its there, but then again this is one impressive piece of...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2008 1 comments

Nikon keeps cranking out new D-SLRs, most recently with the D3 and D300 (see Shutterbug reviews at www.shutterbug.com), and now, building on the great success with their amateur line-up of the D40 and D40X, the new D60. Sporting 10.2 megapixels (same as the D40X), the D60 has the lightweight and portable feel of the D40 series, with some extra tricks up its sleeve. Foregoing...

George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

The affordable yet sophisticated self-contained Genesis 200 ws and 400 ws monolights provide all the power and lighting control needed to create professional-looking portraits and great still life tabletop photographs. They provide recycling times as low as 1 second. The 5v sync voltage is even safe for today's digital cameras.

The convenient rear control panel of...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

For those who worked in the confines of the amber-lit chemical darkroom and experienced the wonder of an image emerging from paper after being dipped in a tray of liquid, the changeover to the digital darkroom, as it has come to be known, has been radical. No longer dealing with dye and density, we are now confronted with changeable codes that are handled by graphic interfaces...

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