John Brandon

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
John Brandon Posted: Mar 01, 2010 0 comments

For the pro photographer, there are two possible scenarios in managing a photographic workflow. One is the scattershot method, the second approach features a clear organizational method.

Filed under
John Brandon Posted: Jul 05, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 11 comments
With each successive release of ACDSee Pro, the photo management suite adds ever-more-powerful features. In this review I hope to help you decide whether or not its features match up with your own workflow, meet your needs, or even improve on existing features to enhance your photographic creations.

In my own workflow, the new version, ACDSee Pro 5, smoothed over a few rough edges in the editing process and made my management chores a bit less time-consuming. The release is not so groundbreaking that it might make you consider abandoning Adobe Lightroom or Apple Aperture altogether, but there are some pro-level additions that are definitely worth considering. The program never crashed and operated quickly for just about any task on a standard desktop PC. Note I said PC—there is no Mac version available or considered at this point.

Filed under
John Brandon Posted: Mar 12, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 4 comments
Adobe Photoshop Elements 10 caters to the entry-level crowd, but is imbued with several professional-level tools. Even when a feature is not really intended for serious photographers, there is a goldmine of functionality that could save countless hours. The app is celebrating 10 years on the market. Adobe has slowly revised the workflow, and it’s getting much better.

In this version, you’ll first see a start-up screen with two buttons, one for organizing photos and one for editing. It makes more sense to click the button to organize images first, especially if you’re not even sure which images need editing.

When you do, one of the first prompts you’ll see asks how you normally import photos. That’s handy, because even the most experienced pro has to get photos off the camera somehow. You might typically load images onto a network drive, or prefer loading directly off the camera. (An option to scan images seems woefully dated these days.) Whatever option you choose, you can always go back and select a different import default. For now, it just means, when you start Elements 10, the app will automatically look for that specific source.

Filed under
John Brandon Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

What if you could take a physical light box—like that ancient cabinet model you once used for viewing slides—and put it inside your computer?

Filed under
John Brandon Posted: Sep 01, 2010 0 comments

If a computer is part of your photographic workflow, then you’re probably already using Adobe’s Photoshop. The program has become standard for serious pros, erstwhile amateurs, and even those who just want to add some flair to their Facebook profile.

Filed under
John Brandon Posted: Dec 01, 2010 0 comments

A smooth workflow makes the job of photography feel more like a passion. You release the shutter button and next thing you know you’re holding a framed comp for a client.

Filed under
John Brandon Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

Workflow has become an important topic in photography. I know it is for me. After a shoot, I’ll rummage through photos on a MacBook Pro trying to pick a few that are worth publishing on my Flickr page, saving several for my permanent archive, and using a small handful for Photoshop experimentation. Of course, you can browse photos on the digital camera itself right after you take a series...

Filed under
John Brandon Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

In a perfect world, photos would magically transport themselves from your camera to a safe location, fully metatagged and color corrected. Alas, the professional's workflow is not that simple. In a digital age, a streamlined workflow hinges on two factors: photo viewing speed and editing agility.

Apple's Aperture 2.1 addresses both...

Filed under
John Brandon Posted: Sep 01, 2010 0 comments

Aperture 3 is an amazingly powerful workflow aid for any photographer. An improved interface that promotes a “work the way you want” aesthetic makes it easy to learn and use.

Filed under
John Brandon Posted: Sep 01, 2009 0 comments

PhotoStudio 6 is a feature-rich application in its own right; for instance, you can create layers for image editing, paint on the image with a variety of brushes, and apply artistic effects.

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading