Jon Sienkiewicz

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Feb 01, 2010 0 comments

For all practical purposes, you can narrow your film scanning options down to four choices. There are three types of scanners: drum, flat-bed, and dedicated film scanner. The fourth alternative is to have your film scanned by a professional lab.

Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Aug 01, 2010 0 comments

Back in the day when prime lenses ruled supreme and snooty purists decried zooms for lack of absolute sharpness, Tele-Converters (TCs) were popular accessories. Photographers wanted to bring distant subjects closer, and TCs provided a means to that end. Also known as tele-extenders, these thick slabs of metal and glass increase the focal length of a given lens while also decreasing the f/stop.

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Dec 01, 2009 0 comments

The guy at the camera store told you that a filter is “cheap insurance against fingerprints and expensive repairs” but was he really looking out for your best interests?

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: May 01, 2010 0 comments

Many of the cameras used by Shutterbug readers use SD memory cards. SD stands for Secure Digital, and it’s the most popular type of media for digital imaging. SD has been around for so long that people use this identifier generically, and refer to all variations simply as “SD.” This practice can lead to problems. There are a couple of new kids on the block, and you should know...

Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Sep 19, 2013 0 comments

The cleverly engineered CapturePRO Camera Clip from Peak Design provides a secure and convenient way to attach a camera to your belt, backpack or other strap. It’s a quick-draw device that allows you to spring into action instantly—but locks down your camera safely when not in use.

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Mar 01, 2007 1 comments

If you think a notebook computer is a scaled-down compromise with a cramped keyboard and tiny screen, think again. Notebooks have become an indispensable tool for photographers. Choosing the right one is easy--there are a few core components that determine how well a computer will perform over the long haul. Here is what you need to know:

Size...

Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

Long before the Mind of Minolta popularized autofocus SLRs with the introduction of the Maxxum 7000 there was the XD.

The year was 1977 and Minolta Camera Company, Ltd. was riding high. Fueled by the success of the SR-T series and the inimitable XE-7, Minolta launched the XD family, beginning with the XD-11 (labeled simply XD in Japan and XD-7 in Europe). The XD-11 was the first...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Dec 19, 2014 0 comments

Photographers depend on the physical characteristics of light to apply their craft, yet the average Joe knows surprisingly little about how light works. It’s not necessary to be an optical engineer to take great photos, but having a basic grounding in the physics of light could help you understand some of the defects found in nearly all lenses (to one degree or another) and the effect that imperfections have on images.

Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Feb 07, 2014 Published: Jan 01, 2014 0 comments

It all began back in 1990 with a shareware program called Paint Shop. Debuting the same year as Adobe PhotoShop 1.0, comparison to that legendary product has been inescapable. Paint Shop, known as PaintShop Pro X6 Ultimate in its current incarnation, has always been associated with three characteristics: extreme affordability, sufficient power for most photo enthusiasts, and Windows-only compatibility. PaintShop Pro has continued to evolve and improve, and today offers many significant enhancements, including the ability to run smoothly on Macs using a Windows emulation program.

Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Oct 16, 2012 Published: Sep 01, 2012 4 comments

It’s a good thing that early photographers didn’t have to pass through airport security with their flash equipment. The pyrotechnics they used to light a scene would surely have merited more than a pat down. Many years ago, long before the flash tube or flashbulb, a century or so before the Flashcube, cameramen used a flash powder called thermite.

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