News

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 19, 2016 0 comments

“A mobile device can display still images and video, and it can broadcast audio,” Sciorio says. “The creation point for all three of those is my camera: it shoots stills, video and records audio. So why was I using only one-third of the tools I had? Why was I trying to sell only one kind of product?”

Filed under
Dan Havlik Posted: Apr 18, 2016 0 comments

Interested in learning more about how to be a better portrait or wedding photographer but not interested in paying a lot for it? Well, The Wedding School is offering three days of live online classes this week from some of the leading names in portrait and wedding photography. And the price is certainly right. It’s free!

Ron Leach Posted: Apr 18, 2016 0 comments

Street photographer Omar Z Robles has spent the past two years photographing ballet dancers among what he refers to as the urban landscapes of New York. Thanks to a grant from the Bessie Foundation, he recently traveled to Cuba—a country with a long tradition of dance—and the images he captured are amazing.

Howard Millard Posted: Apr 15, 2016 0 comments

HDR, as most photographers know, stands for High Dynamic Range, allowing you to capture a wider range of highlight and shadow detail than you could in a single frame. You create an HDR image by shooting several identically framed shots of the same scene at different exposures, often with three brackets such as -2, 0, and +2 EV. The newest kid on the HDR block is Aurora HDR Pro from Macphun, currently for Mac only, but with a Windows version in the works.

Posted: Apr 14, 2016 0 comments

When 14th century poet Piers Plowman said “Patience is a virtue” he could have been channeling the future work of National Geographic Photographer Charlie Hamilton James who captured this amazing image after making over 200,000 photographs with a motion–activated camera in Grand Teton National Park. James was intent on getting images of bears and wolves with the Teton Mountains in the background, and he sure came up with a winner!

Filed under
Ron Leach Posted: Apr 14, 2016 0 comments

According to NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams, one of his favorite activities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is taking photographs of Planet Earth. In this fascinating video from NASA Space Station Live, Williams explains the equipment he uses—including a lens selection from wide–angle to an 800mm telephoto equipped with a 1.4 multiplier.

Ron Leach Posted: Apr 13, 2016 0 comments

Brazilian photographer Marcos Alberti was inspired by an apocryphal quote that goes something like this: “The first glass of wine is all about the food, the second glass is about love, and the third glass is about mayhem.” Thus, Alberti’s Three Glasses of Wine project was born.

Filed under
Ron Leach Posted: Apr 13, 2016 0 comments

Researchers at the Columbia University Computer Vision Laboratory are pursuing a radically different approach to photography with the design of optics and sensors applied to a large, thin flexible sheet. Rather than the conventional approach of taking photographs from a single point in space, this camera would enable image capture from any surface—regardless of shape.

Filed under
Ron Leach Posted: Apr 13, 2016 0 comments

You know the old adage “The photographer with the best toys wins?” Well, Mexican shooter Felix Hernandez Rodriquez is doing just that by using tiny toys to create some very impactful and semi–realistic images.

Dan Havlik Posted: Apr 12, 2016 0 comments

Hasselblad showed off its new H6D medium format camera at an exclusive media event in New York City today and Shutterbug was on hand to test out this hotly anticipated system. The H6D camera, which was officially announced last week, comes in two versions: the H6D-100c with a 100-megapixel CMOS sensor, and the H6D-50c with a 50MP CMOS sensor.

Filed under
Stan Trzoniec Posted: Apr 12, 2016 0 comments

Like many photographers, when Nikon introduced their 20-35mm f/2.8 lens I just had to have one. Being a commercial photographer, the ability to carry a zoom that would cover this field of view was very handy, especially for assignments that involved shooting in buildings or offices for public relations clients. While the lens was exciting, the best images were captured at around f/5.6 to f/8 when the corners started to match the sharpness of dead center. Following that was the Nikkor 28-70mm f/2.8, which was more commonly known as the “beast” in photographic circles because it gave us more breathing room at the long end, complete with AF-S focusing. Although it weighed in at two pounds, it was a sharp lens!

Staff Posted: Apr 12, 2016 0 comments

If you think about all the people snapping shots of their favorite meals with their smartphones these days, you might say food photography is one of the more popular imaging genres right now. But while many of these phoned-in food photos end up on Instagram and other social networks, most of the images are downright unappetizing.

Ron Leach Posted: Apr 11, 2016 0 comments

The Rescued Film Project is an amazing online gallery of images that were captured on film between the 1930's and late 1990's. The fascinating and poignant video below chronicles the discovery and restoration of 31 rolls of undeveloped film shot by an American solidier during World War II. When you see the resulting photos, prepare to be stunned.

Joe Farace Posted: Apr 08, 2016 0 comments

Many years ago, along with some fellow writers, I visited an Agfa—remember them?—facility in Brussels. During the tour one of the leaders asked, “What do you think of the idea of adding a phone to a digital camera?” We all laughed and thought it was the dumbest idea we’d ever heard. It turned out that he was asking the wrong question; it should have been, “What do you think of adding a camera to a phone?”

Staff Posted: Apr 08, 2016 0 comments

Photographer Chase Jarvis recently shared this whimsical image on his Facebook page along with the quote “You’ll never influence the world by trying to be like it.” Jarvis’s following of some 140,000 Facebook fans went wild, giving the post nearly 1,500 Likes, 77 shares, and many positive comments.

Pages