Barry Tanenbaum

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 01, 2010 0 comments

The thing you’ve got to watch out for is the pilot who gets a little too into the photography.

It’s not a common occurrence, to be sure, but…“I had a pilot who almost killed me,” says Cameron Davidson, who spends a good portion of his time in the air shooting for clients and his own projects. “I have this strict rule:...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 01, 2010 0 comments

Sports photojournalist Dave Black wants his photographs to attract and hold your attention. And he wants them to be as different from the next guy’s as possible; the next guy is, after all, the competition.

In search of the big differences that make for high impact photographs, Dave uses ideas as much as he uses technology.Here are four examples of his thinking about...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jan 01, 2010 0 comments

Eventually the upper basin states of Utah, New Mexico, Colorado, and Wyoming, to hold back water from the lower basin states of Nevada, Arizona, and California, began in 1956 to build the Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River.

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 01, 2009 14 comments

Ladies and gentlemen, I am proud to present to you the noted nature and wildlife photographer Kevin Schafer, a man who may well serve as a role model for the pack rats among us; a man who faced his demons and trashed them.

Here we salute Kevin not for his outstanding photography—he is a recipient of the North American Nature Photography Association’s Outstanding Nature...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jun 01, 2009 0 comments

Dear Mr. King,
When I saw Chris Alvanas’s HDR (High Dynamic Range) photographs, my first thought was, they could be covers of Stephen King novels. They held mystery and more than a hint of menace; they suggested a story that would keep me turning pages long into the night.

What’s HDR photography? It’s a technique that makes possible...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 01, 2009 0 comments

After a while, showing wasn’t enough. Telling became the point.

And because Chris Heisey knows his Civil War, he has a lot to tell in his photographs.

Chris has been photographing Civil War battlefields for almost 20 years, and at the start he took straightforward record shots. “I’m self-taught,” he says, “and...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

The who, what, when, and where of the story are easy.

Commercial and advertising photographer Charles Orrico was commissioned about two years ago by an ad agency to photograph at the abandoned Kings Park Psychiatric Center in Kings Park, New York, on behalf of a holding company that planned to develop the site. Building 93, the main structure in the complex, was of special...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

Last fall I got an e-mail and a few JPEG attachments from Jody Dole, a commercial and advertising photographer whose career adventures I’ve chronicled over the years in these and other pages. “I’ve been having a good time making 19th-century cyanotype look-alike images,” Jody wrote.

Turns out, Jody had been up to more than cyanotypes. He also had a...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 01, 2008 1 comments

Stuck in traffic one day on Sunset Boulevard, Patrick Ecclesine got an idea. Thinking about the street—“twenty-four miles from the barrio to the beach,” he writes at his website (www.ecclesine.com), “through some of the poorest neighborhoods in the city to some of the richest neighborhoods in the world”—two...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

In the early days of digital imaging, we were promised much. Suppliers, manufacturers, photo writers, and early-adopter photographers talked about how digital would allow us do more with photographs. We'd be able to see them instantly, send them quickly, and, most important to the serious-minded among us, control them creatively. Digital cameras and the digital process would...

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading