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Staff Posted: Apr 08, 2016 0 comments

Photographer Chase Jarvis recently shared this whimsical image on his Facebook page along with the quote “You’ll never influence the world by trying to be like it.” Jarvis’s following of some 140,000 Facebook fans went wild, giving the post nearly 1,500 Likes, 77 shares, and many positive comments.

Staff Posted: Jan 17, 2017 0 comments

The Huangshan Mountains (also known as the Yellow Mountains) in eastern China are famous for their steep ridges; dreamy cloud formations that swirl around the peaks; and incredible, breathtaking views. They draw millions of Chinese visitors each year, but relatively few foreigners. One “foreigner” who made the trek recently was photographer Bill Sisson who traveled there last July and captured this spectacular shot.

Staff Posted: Dec 08, 2015 0 comments

What’s the biggest challenge about photographing a dirt bike jumping into a swimming pool? “Aside from not dying by either being hit by the bike from landing so close, or being electrocuted by the lighting power pack since the area around the pool was only about two-feet wide, the hardest part was to understand how to send a signal underwater to fire off the strobes above to get the necessary lighting,” photographer Jean-Paul Van Swae said about this spectacular shot.

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Staff Posted: May 29, 2015 0 comments

Photographer Jordan Matter captured this striking image of dancer Michaela DePrince in Becket, Massachusetts, as part of the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival.

Staff Posted: Sep 30, 2016 0 comments

Photographing the ice caves underneath the Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska, can be a challenge. First of all, the caves, while beautiful, are a treacherous place to shoot. “There is danger involved in going inside, particularly at the entrance, as ice falls regularly and the caves are sometimes closed and some become impassible,” photographer Blaine Harrington explains.

Staff Posted: Feb 10, 2017 0 comments

Alexandre Voyer, a freediving photographer, specializes in documenting ocean creatures with the help of his Canon DSLR and some serious lung power. “All the photos are made on a single breath of air—I don’t use oxygen tanks—with natural light,” Voyer says.

Staff Posted: Jan 08, 2016 0 comments

This amazing image might look like it was shot on a different planet but it was actually captured in commercial photographer Michelle Monique’s living room for her first paid gig back in 2009.

Staff Posted: Oct 21, 2016 0 comments

Ulf Amundsen captured this epic image of a herd of elephants in Etosha National Park in Namibia, Africa. “It was a straightforward shoot during midday in dry and dusty conditions,” Amundsen explains.

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Staff Posted: Jun 23, 2015 0 comments

While walking around the pyramids in Cairo, Egypt, in 2004, photojournalist Ami Vitale spotted a man sitting alone in the desert with his camel. “We did not share the same language to speak to one another but as I approached, he laid his head on his camel’s head,” Vitale recalls.

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Staff Posted: Feb 07, 2013 Published: Jan 01, 2013 0 comments
When we received a review copy of Pring’s Photographer’s Miscellany (Ilex, $12.99, ISBN: 978-1-907579-43-1) we felt there was so much fun information about photography included that it would be great to share this book with readers. The excerpts here are just a few of the many illuminating, humorous, and at times arcane information Pring’s delivers. The book also contains numerous quotes to ponder from photographers and philosophers alike.—Editor

Agent Provocateur
The Minox subminiature camera was invented in 1936 by Walter Zapp, a German living in Estonia (this modern Estonian stamp celebrates Zapp’s original patent). Unable to get it manufactured locally, he eventually established production in neighboring Latvia, but during World War II the factory was overrun, once by German forces and twice by the Russians. Production resumed in former West Germany in 1948, by which time the Minox had become the preferred equipment of real or imagined espionage agents worldwide. Grasping the attached measuring chain, the spy in a hurry could extend it to touch the secret item, shoot without using the viewfinder, and be assured of a sharp copy of, for example, an A4 or 8 1/2 x 11 inch document. The Minox uses specially cut, unsprocketed film which is advanced each time the case is closed, an action which also protects the viewfinder and lens.

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