Ron Leach

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Ron Leach Posted: Nov 24, 2014 0 comments

As 2014 draws to a close and I write the 100th installment of this column, I decided to reflect not on the future, but rather how the photo industry has evolved over the past 10 years or so. The pace of technical innovation in imaging gear has progressed so rapidly over the past decade, that is easy to forget how much has changed.

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Ron Leach Posted: Oct 17, 2011 0 comments
A “great” photograph isn’t necessarily a beautiful photograph. In fact, some of history’s most compelling images have been those that made a statement about contemporary culture or motivated people to support a cause. These days, the power of photography to instigate social change is perhaps most evident in documentary images of public protests here and abroad.

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Ron Leach Posted: Feb 21, 2012 0 comments
Some of the most haunting images of our time are those made in areas of armed conflict. Among the earliest war photographs were those taken by an anonymous American who made a series of daguerreotypes in 1847 during the Mexican-American War.
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Ron Leach Posted: May 21, 2012 1 comments
There’s a little company in Tuscon, Arizona that is literally working on some giant ideas—like a digital camera with so much dynamic range it can capture both the sun and the stars in broad daylight!

Spectral Instruments has built a 20-year reputation as a premier provider of cooled, high-end CCD-based camera systems for scientific imaging applications from astronomy to pre-clinical drug discovery. This new project, the “1110 Series,” involves a camera with a 112-megapixel, black-and-white sensor without a Bayer mask or filter of any type that could “detract from the overall image sharpness.”

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Ron Leach Posted: Dec 18, 2012 1 comments
Earlier this month a national debate ensued after a freelance photographer captured the image of a man just before a New York subway train fatally struck him after he was pushed onto the tracks. The controversial photograph was subsequently published on the cover of the NY Post under the gruesome headline “DOOMED.”
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Ron Leach Posted: Jan 22, 2014 0 comments
The New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust recently discovered and restored a treasure-trove of century-old cellulose nitrate negatives left behind by the ill-fated Ross Sea party when they were rescued after spending three years struggling to survive on Ross Island after their ship broke loose from it’s moorings and blew out to sea. The small box of 22 unprocessed negatives were part of more than 10,000 objects conserved at Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s hut and brought back to New Zealand by the Trust and painstakingly restored.
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Ron Leach Posted: Apr 24, 2007 0 comments

Truth in Journalism

by Ron Leach

We heard an unsettling report on the radio last night regarding an awarding-winning
Toledo Blade photographer who recently resigned after admitting that he digitally
altered the content of a photograph that was published on the newspaper's
front page. The image by Allan Detrichshowe...

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Ron Leach Posted: Jul 22, 2014 3 comments
While we often devote this column to a discussion of evolving technologies for innovative photographic gear, this month we’d like to tell you about some changes we have in the works for Shutterbug and solicit your input for updating the magazine, our website, and our social media initiatives.
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Ron Leach Posted: Mar 19, 2012 0 comments
The Future of Photography Museum Amsterdam (FOAM) recently celebrated its 10th anniversary with an exhibit and series of activities reflecting upon the future of our craft. The organization’s mission is to enable people throughout the world to experience and enjoy photography—whether it's at their museum in Amsterdam, on their website (www.foam.org), or via their internationally distributed magazine.
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Ron Leach Posted: Nov 29, 2005 0 comments

Photography is full of `scapes: landscapes, seascapes, and cityscapes
are all very popular subjects. But the next time you grab your camera and head
out for a day of shooting, why not take try to capture what's on "the
other side" and shoot some windowscapes for a change? There are a couple
of different approaches to take. You can use a window as a compositional device
to frame your subject, or you can concentrate of photographing objects you find
inside or behind a window.

A
polarizing filter eliminated the distracting reflections in this
scene shot through a window on a bright, sunny day.

Photography by Ron Leach

...

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