Digital Innovations

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 1999 0 comments

"Sometimes I feel
like f/5.6 in a f/2.8 world."

--Gene Jones

Regardless of which computer
platform you work on, sooner or latersom...

Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Jul 01, 1999 0 comments

"What me worry"--Alfred E. Newman

For many people, planning for New Year's Eve will be a little different this year. Instead of just ordering party hats, noisemakers, and your favorite...

Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

"Without contraries is no progression. Attraction and repulsion, reason and energy, love and hate, are necessary to human existence."--William Blake, 1790

At the unveiling of a $40,000 mural at Livermore, California's new public library, people were surprised when the artist misspelled the names of Einstein, Shakespeare, Van...

Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

"I think it is good that books still exist, but they do make me sleepy."--Frank Zappa

One book that hopefully won't put you to sleep is entitled How I Photograph Women and is the successor to my eBook titled Everyday Glamour Photography, which just happens to be this book's subtitle. The 80-page book contains more than 100 color and black and...

Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: May 09, 2014 Published: Apr 01, 2014 0 comments
Aside from how to pronounce my name, the main question readers ask is about the workflow I use to process image files. I find it’s convenient to work with two desktop computers, often at the same time, with a laptop computer used on the road and for testing new software. A Mac Pro handles my daily work with an iMac tasked for e-mail and research but also as a live backup when problems occur with computer number one. The iMac also runs Microsoft Windows 7 using Apple’s Boot Camp. Since my laptop is used for experimentation, and that’s where you’ll find the latest OS and imaging software, I don’t store anything critical on it.
Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Sep 19, 2014 0 comments
Like most photographers I occasionally become equipment obsessed, but sometimes even the smallest tool, something as simple and useful as a new LensPen, can make creating new images a little easier. I’ve often said that the most important piece of equipment is the one between a photographer’s ears, but creating images also requires tools. Choosing the right tool or accessory may not make the difference between a good photograph and a bad one, but may make the difference in whether or not you even try to capture it.
Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Mar 28, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 1 comments
As a creative medium, traditionalists may call black-and-white photographs “monochrome” while some digital imagers may prefer the more computerese “grayscale,” but there’s more to this medium than just an absence of color. One of the reasons that purists prefer “monochrome” is that it’s a more precise term that covers images created using sepia and other tones. Many digital cameras have Black and White or Sepia modes that let you capture images directly in monochrome but these photographs are really color (RGB) files without any color! If you prefer, you can capture your images in color then use any of the software I’ll introduce this month to convert that color photograph into a monochromatic one. You’ll also find a few useful hardware tools to make your photographic life a bit easier.
Joe Farace Posted: Jun 25, 2013 Published: May 01, 2013 1 comments
While it may not be nice to fool Mother Nature, photographers have been doing just that since Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths photographed the “Cottingley Fairies” in 1917, but a lot has changed since then and we’re now more skeptical of images that appear “shopped.” (Portrait photographers engaged in retouching even before Mathew Brady opened his New York studio in 1844.) To me, part of the fun of photography is enhancing reality, creating images that could be true or might be true in a parallel Fringe-like universe. That’s one of the reasons I like shooting digital infrared images because photography, for me, is all about having fun and if you happen to play a harmless—emphasis on harmless—photographic April Fool’s prank on someone, let’s hope it’s accepted in the spirit of the day.
Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Apr 05, 2013 Published: Mar 01, 2013 0 comments
While some people believe the proverb below is really a curse, what’s often overlooked is that it’s part of three such phrases that includes “May you come to the attention of those in authority” and concludes with “May you find what you are looking for.” There is no doubt that we’re living in interesting times, photographically speaking. The paradigm shift that replaced film with silicon continues while spiraling off in different directions with SLRs delivering more megapixels and image quality than the Honda Accord-priced medium format digital backs of a few years ago and small chip interchangeable-lens mirrorless cameras that are more powerful than early digital SLRs. As the point-and-shoot market implodes, being replaced by ever-more competent smartphones, the paradigm shift doesn’t show any signs of abating, but as I’ve said here before, it’s not the tool that makes the image, it’s the photographer.
Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Oct 05, 2011 Published: Aug 01, 2011 1 comments
You don’t always need a lens to make photographs. When I was a student at the Maryland Institute College of Art, our instructor Jack Wilgus had all his students make their own pinhole cameras and shoot images with them. I took the easy way out and used a Quaker Oats box and used photographic paper cut into a circle to fit the box as my capture media. My homemade camera produced round, negative images that I kidded myself into believing echoed the style of early photographs but now, as with many things photographic and not, I know better. Yet one thing remains: you don’t need a lens to make photographs. Sure, many new SLRs, such as the Olympus E-30 that I tested (April, 2009, issue of Shutterbug), have a “pinhole” filter but the camera itself uses a lens and internal software to create the look of the real thing. But shooting film in a real pinhole camera brings back that very “ah-ha” that Ernst Haas was talking about.
Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Jul 01, 2010 0 comments

“Thanks to the Interstate Highway System, it is now possible to travel from coast to coast without seeing anything.”—Charles Kuralt

The most important secret I can share with you about travel photography is that you should not buy a new camera or lens just before leaving for Kathmandu, Machu Picchu, or even Boise. The next most essential...

Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Sep 03, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 1 comments
Alien Skin Software’s Exposure 5 is powerful monochrome conversion software that lets you produce accurate film simulations while adding a range of creative effects. Wrapped up in a redesigned and easy-to-use interface, Exposure 5 can also be launched as a stand-alone application, which can be useful in a workflow that doesn’t support plug-ins. This latest version includes controls for emulating color or black and white so you don’t have to switch between modes or, as in previous versions, separate plug-ins. It’s all one happy family.
Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

"Sirius Black was and remains to this day...Harry Potter's godfather."--J.K. Rowling

When the Argentinean home of film director Francis Ford Coppola was burglarized among the missing items was his computer containing family photographs and his writings from the past 15 years, including the screenplay for Tetro, his next film. My late brother...

Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Dec 09, 2014 0 comments
When I was a student at the Maryland Institute College of Art back in the film days, there was a bulletin board near the school’s darkrooms where misplaced negatives were pinned. It was officially called “The Little Lost Negative Board” but someone had surreptitiously added, “Someday my prints will come.”
Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

"Life is like an ice-cream cone, you have to lick it one day at a time."--Charles M. Schulz

On October 2, 1950, the first Peanuts comic strip appeared in a daily newspaper. Coincidently, October 2nd is also my wife Mary's birthday, although she's a bit younger than Snoopy and the gang. As a lifelong Peanuts fan, it's kinda fitting that...

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading