Please comment briefly on the attributes you set in the camera, even if you shoot raw.

Editor's picture
In-camera image processing includes curve control settings, color adjustments and even, with the new Olympus models, some "art" filters. Does this strike you as convenient and a great way to handle image attributes when you make the image (saving time in processing later) or do you prefer to do all or most of your processing after downloading?
Please comment briefly on the attributes you set in the camera, even if you shoot raw.
I like the fact that can a lot of processing work done by the camera and don't want to be bothered later.
50% (83 votes)
I shoot raw only and do all my processing later.
36% (59 votes)
I shoot raw but still set up the camera for certain image attributes and let the camera microprocessor handle certain tasks.
14% (24 votes)
Total votes: 166
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Comments
Jacqueline Slavney's picture

I prefer to do processing in Photoshop where I can work in peace and take my time and can see the image as big as I want. It would be nice if cameras had fewer and less complicated controls to do what they do best and leave the editing for the computer. Perhaps then cameras could be smaller and lighter as well as simpler to use.

Lola Lawrence's picture

When photographing birds in nautre each image could require different settings etc. I'd rather get the image and process later.

Dale Hazard's picture

I think all these adjustments the camera can perform are just a lot of hype created by the camera manufacturers to either make you want to buy another camera or to make these cameras more attractive to amateurs. Like film shooting, the object is to create the perfect image and then once you have that you can manipulate the image anyway you choose.

Eugene Marrero's picture

I don't think it applies to all things, but sometimes in a challenging scene, I can see the benefit of have some creative control at the point of image capture.

Kurt Reinhardt's picture

Shooting digital is just like shooting slides. You have to know what you're doing. Shooting in Jpeg is like having slides processed at a Lab. Shooting Raw is like custom processing each individual shot separately, a job okay for obsessive people but too time consuming.

Andy Kayser's picture

I rather concentrate on shooting and leave the processing later. It is difficult to view the image on the camera sensor in daylight let alone make processing decisions.

Peter A.  White's picture

I must still have a film mentality after 40 yrs of shooting pix. I shoot in Raw mode, make minor tweaks in Aperature and bring a file any extra work to the pro's. That way I'm out taking pictures again!

C.  Derousseau's picture

I actually shoot mostly JPEGs, rather than raw, but the same applies.

Richard Griggs's picture

I set only exposure nd white balance in the camera, leaving all else to software under my direct control later.

Harry Boyd's picture

I prefer processes over which I have direct and total control. However, really basic in-camera controls, such as noise reduction, is fine.

Bob M.'s picture

I am a photographer and musician. If I record a track with effects I am stuck with it. If I record it dry I have unlimited possibilities. It' the same with a photograph.

cena's picture
I have a travel bag set up

I have a travel bag set up with the ability to quickly remove a layer of equipment and place in one of the trays for x-ray. Therefore,4A0-108
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