Mamiya’s DL28 Medium Format D-SLR

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Technical Specifications: Mamiya 645AFD III
Type: 6x4.5cm format (actual image size 56x41.5mm), electronically-controlled focal-plane shutter, TTL multimode AE, AF single lens reflex
Viewfinder: Fixed prism viewfinder, with built-in diopter adjustment and built-in eyepiece shutter
Focusing Screen: Interchangeable
AF System: TTL phase-difference detection type, user-selectable focusing point (center, left, right, or auto), with AF lock
Exposure Control Modes: Manual, Flash (X) sync, Aperture Priority AE, Shutter Priority AE, Programmed AE with program shift; AE lock; auto-bracketing (two or three frames selectable: 0.3, 05, 0.7, 1 EV steps); TTL flash (with SCA adapter)
TTL Metering Method: Five-segment evaluative center-weighted average with bright point elimination, spot, variable ratio auto-shift, center-weighted average
Metering Range: 2 EV to 19 EV (ISO 100, f/2.8 lens)
Exposure Compensation: +/- 3 EV or +/- 5 EV (1/3, 1/2, or full steps)
Shutter Speeds/AE & Manual: 30 seconds to 1/4000 sec; X-sync: 1/125 sec; B (Bulb, electronically controlled)
Flash Synchronization/Auto: 1/125 sec or slower
Multiple Exposure: Yes
Mirror-Up: Electronically activated
Self-Timer: 2-60 seconds
Depth-Of-Field Preview: Yes
Tripod Socket: 1/4” and 3/8”
Power Requirements: Six AA batteries (alkaline-magnesium or rechargeable Ni-MH)
Size: 6x5x7.2”
Weight: 61 oz without batteries

Technical Specifications: Leaf Aptus-II 6
CCD Size: 44x33mm/6144x4622 pixels
Resolution: 28 megapixels
Capture Rate (Sec/Frame): 1
File Size (Raw): 53MB/31MB lossless compression
TIFF 16-bit: 159MB
ISO Sensitivity: 50-800
Color Management Workflow: Range of 16 profiles, including factory profiles, plus user camera profiles
LCD Screen: 6x7cm (3.5”), color
View Camera Compatible: Yes
Power: Powered separately by a lithium-ion battery
Dimensions: 3.7x3.2x2.3”
Weight: 1.3 lbs

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Comments
merdeka04's picture
This camera would work best

This camera would work best if used with a tripod. The focus may sometimes fail you so you should center the subject to get sharper image. - Mallory Fleming