George Schaub

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George Schaub  |  Dec 19, 2011  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2011  |  1 comments

There’s no question that glossy and satin or pearl-type surfaces give an image more “pop,” but on the other hand you might want to use a matte surface to enhance the look and feel of certain images that rely less on pop than a quieter mood. It could be boiled down to a simple rule of thumb: for rich, high-saturation images you might use a glossy or semigloss; for more subtle colors it might be better to use a matte or satin. In the black-and-white realm it’s more of a toss-up but I think the same general rule applies. For example, for architectural images of adobe or stucco wall buildings I use matte; for glass and steel skyscrapers I choose glossy. Notice that I always modify the recommendations with “might”: if you really get into papers for printing you’ll make your own judgments. But there’s no denying that surface decisions play a role in overall effectiveness of the image.

 

George Schaub  |  Oct 28, 2011  |  0 comments

The new Nikon P7100 offers many function buttons and dials along with a large mode dial on the top to choose standard exposure modes like P, S, A and M. The camera offers a full automatic mode, scene modes and special effect modes (like B&W, sepia tone effect, “High Key” effect and more). In addition, the P7100 offers three user modes that can be saved as U1-U3 and accessed directly on the mode dial.

George Schaub  |  Oct 18, 2011  |  0 comments

The Olympus E-P3 is the follower of the E-P2 and E-P1, the first Olympus Micro Four Thirds cameras that were offered as “retro style cameras”. The E-P3 offers the same image sensor as the E-P2, with a nominal resolution of 12MP, but the E-P3 uses a newly developed image processor unit called “TruePic VI” plus offers some enhancements in the AF-speed. The automatic focusing system is really fast and showed a very good performance during our tests. In addition it has some special modes like “AF tracking mode”, which will help both photographers and videographers.

George Schaub  |  Oct 10, 2011  |  0 comments

This is a test report on the new Panasonic FZ48 integral lens camera. The camera looks like a compact SLR. It has a big grip on the right hand side of the body, which allows for comfortable handling for shooting, important for a long-range zoom such as this.

George Schaub  |  Nov 28, 2011  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2011  |  0 comments
In this issue we feature images from the last roll of Kodachrome film ever processed. Steve McCurry’s work has always been admirable, but here the photographs have a special poignancy because they will be irrevocably tied to the end of an era in photography. These iconic images now reside in the Eastman House in Rochester, a fitting setting for them among the daguerreotypes, albumen prints, kallitypes, and other images created by processes that have become part of history. True, you can emulate the “look” of these processes with software, and even recreate some of the old paper print processes using custom-mix chemicals and old formulae, but I doubt very much that anyone is going to attempt to set up the massive machinery and chemical soups required to allow Kodachrome to be processed ever again.
George Schaub  |  Dec 01, 2011  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2011  |  0 comments
Gerald L. Fine, of Northbrook, Illinois and Rancho Mirage, California, passed away on July 5, 2011 at the age of 85. Jerry was a kind and devoted husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. He was also an astute businessman who, 50 years ago, founded Neil Enterprises, Inc. and guided it to become the largest photo novelty company in the country. A marketing and merchandising expert and innovator, Jerry pioneered a myriad of photo-related promotional products, including the photo mug and photo keychain. He had a vision, an entrepreneurial spirit, and a generosity that always put people over profits.

His dedication and determination helped grow the company into the success it is today. The company is now in its third generation with Jerry’s children and grandchildren working there, including Neil Fine, the current president.

Jerry Fine was born on December 28, 1925 in Chicago, Illinois. He graduated from Hyde Park High School and joined the Navy where he was stationed at Pearl Harbor during World War II. He returned to Chicago after the war and attended the University of Illinois at Navy Pier and received his degree in accounting at Northwestern University. In 1947, he met the love of his life, Lois Berman, at the Merchandise Mart where he worked at his uncle’s liquor store and she at her aunts’ lingerie shop. Together, they lived a charmed life, enjoyed a loving, 62-year-marriage, raised a beautiful family, and created a thriving business. He is survived by his wife Lois; his three children, Carol (Robert Jacobson), Andrea (Eric London), and Neil Fine (Karen); his nine grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

George Schaub  |  Nov 10, 2011  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2011  |  2 comments

The 12.1-megapixel Nikon COOLPIX P500 ($399.95, MSRP) is an integral lens camera with an incredible zoom range of 36x—that’s optical, not digital zoom and it gives you the equivalent angle of view of a wide-angle 22.5mm to a super tele of 810mm! The Zoom-Nikkor ED glass lens can also be used for “super close-ups” with a minimum focusing distance of 0.4”.

George Schaub  |  Sep 30, 2011  |  2 comments

The SD1 is Sigma’s new flagship SLR system. It uses a brand new sensor with Foveon technology and a nominal resolution of 14.8 MP. This means that the camera is able to record RGB information for every single pixel. Standard digital cameras use sensors with the “classic” Bayer pattern, which means that every single pixel detects only one color information (red, green or blue) and then must undergo color interpolation.

George Schaub  |  Sep 07, 2011  |  2 comments

The A-35 is based on the Sony SLT system, which means the camera uses a translucent mirror system. The mirror is fixed and therefore the camera doesn’t offer an optical SLR viewfinder; instead, it uses a high resolution electronic viewfinder and an LCD monitor – just like a CSC (compact system camera).The ELV of the Sony A35 has a resolution of 1.15 million RGB dots and shows a very crisp and clear image.

George Schaub  |  Oct 27, 2011  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2011  |  1 comments

Let’s face it—some images just look better on a glossy surface. Yet, some folks spurn gloss for its “commercial” cachet and snapshot aesthetic. For those who prefer a “crisp” look to their prints but eschew gloss for practical and aesthetic reasons, a paper like the new Lasal Exhibition Luster could do the trick. Replacing Moab’s former Lasal Photo Luster (a 270 gsm paper vs. this one’s 300 gsm), this Resin-Coated (RC) paper has a bright white base, is flexible yet strong, and touts a new coating technology that the company claims yields improved scratch resistance and enhanced “opacity.” The paper is affordable for its class, with letter-size paper well below $1 per sheet (in 50-sheet packs), 13x19” at slightly under $2 a sheet, and a 17”x100’ roll at $143, all quoted from the company’s website.

 

Being an RC paper, the company says you can print using either dye or pigment-ink printers, although it says pigment is preferred. Lacking a dye printer our print runs were done using an Epson 3800 (pigment) printer using Epson (Premium Luster) and Moab ICC profiles, and both Photoshop and Epson printer controls. Color and black-and-white images of landscapes, people, and graphics were chosen for the tests. Prints were left overnight to cure, although we note that prints were instant dry and the paper showed no signs of ink “wetness” sometimes seen with fiber-based papers right off the press, and there was no dry down effect perceived. Prints were made with Photo Black ink settings.

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