Joe Farace

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Joe Farace  |  Jan 01, 2004  |  0 comments

"It ain't easy being green."
--Kermit T. Frog

To paraphrase the singing amphibian, "it ain't easy having a website," especially like those...

Joe Farace  |  Aug 01, 2005  |  0 comments

"In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move."
--Douglas Adams

I n the May issue, I introduced you to a low or no cost way to build a photography website using Exhibit Engine (http://photography-on-the.net/ee/)...

Joe Farace  |  May 01, 2005  |  0 comments

"I have no life, just e-mail."
--Michael Jantze

The World Wide Web provides an international showcase for your images. Would I have ever seen the stunning work of Russian photographer Evgeniy Shaman (www.photo.gothic.ru/shamanix/index_e.htm) without the Internet? Nyet! If...

Joe Farace  |  Apr 01, 2009  |  0 comments

“April Fool. The March fool with another month added to his folly.”—Ambrose Bierce

The best thing photographers can do to showcase their work is build a website, especially one that features their own name as a domain. Oh sure, Flickr and its clones are OK to get started, but when you get serious about your photography you need to get serious about marketing, too. There...

Joe Farace  |  Jul 01, 2005  |  0 comments

If there is in any theme to Web Profiles during 2005 it's that there are lots of ways to create an Internet homepage. Unlike other technologies used in web design, CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) wasn't adapted from the print world and was developed specifically to enhance the HTML (HyperText Markup Language) code that's the basic building block off the World Wide...

Joe Farace  |  Mar 01, 2002  |  0 comments

You know how it goes: The Art Director says, "I know you can photograph right-handed baseball players, but can you photograph left-handed ones?"

An unfortunate reality of the...

Joe Farace  |  Dec 08, 2011  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2011  |  1 comments

It’s called “continuous lighting” because it’s on continuously, much like a light bulb or the sun for that matter, enabling you to use your in-camera meter to measure the light falling on your subject. Continuous lighting lets you see how all of the light—shadows and highlights—is falling on your subject, but continuous sources sometimes use quartz or photoflood bulbs that can be hot, even dangerously so, leading to the use of the term “hot lights” to describe them. An increasing number of continuous lighting tools are now being made using other kinds of light sources, even LED, producing cool “hot” lights. And that brings us to the subject of this review—the Calumet (www.calumetphoto.com) Pro Series LED Panel Light.

Joe Farace  |  Jul 01, 2002  |  0 comments

If you're a location photographer who needs a lighting kit that's lightweight, rugged, and can handle whatever kind of assignment that gets thrown at it, Calumet's Travelite 750 One-Head Umbrella Kit may be just what you need. With a price tag under $550...

Joe Farace  |  Sep 08, 2011  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2011  |  28 comments

Canon offers five different 70-300mm zoom lenses in its product lineup. Why so many? They obviously think this is a popular and practical focal length range and I happen to agree. I even own one of them myself—the EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM—but the EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM tested is the mac daddy of ’em all. Part of the reason for its high price tag ($1599) is that it’s the only one of the five lenses that is resplendent in white paint (the better for TV cameras to see), making it part of the “L” series. (See “Just For The ‘L’ Of It.”) Canon’s L lenses typically have wide apertures fixed throughout the zoom range but in this case all five lenses in this focal length range have identical f/4-5.6 apertures.

 

The new Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM telephoto zoom lens features two Ultra Low Dispersion (UD) elements for improved image quality and reduced chromatic aberration. It incorporates a floating focusing mechanism for sharpness from close-up (3.9 feet) to infinity plus an Image Stabilization (IS) system that Canon claims increases usability by approximately four stops. The IS system includes a function that allows it to continue to operate even when the camera or the lens, the latter being a better idea, is mounted on a tripod. There’s an optional ($189.95) Canon Tripod Mount C for mounting on a tripod or monopod but I was unable to get one for testing. The lens is dust- and water-resistant and features a Fluorine coating that resists smears and fingerprints and significantly eases lens cleaning, but that doesn’t make me suggest less vigorous lens protection. More later.

 

Joe Farace  |  Nov 08, 2011  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2011  |  5 comments

The generation of Canon EOS digital SLRs beginning with the 10D have been evolutionary, with each camera adding resolution and new features. The 60D continues in that vein but also takes a slightly different tack, adding some features from Canon’s own PowerShot series, bringing in functionality like a 3” flip-out LCD screen, and adding some creative effects that show how software is becoming an increasingly important part of any hardware offering. Each of these creative filters, including Soft Focus, Grainy Black and White, Toy Camera, and Miniature Effect, can be applied to a captured image creating a second “filtered” version, leaving the original file unaffected.

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