Scanner News

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David B. Brooks  |  Feb 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Technical Specifications
Scanner Type: Flat-bed color with TMA for scanning all standard film formats
Photo & Film Restoration: Digital ICE (built-in) to restore damaged photos and film
Color Restoration: ColoRescue for photos and film
Bit Depth: True 48-bit color
...

Cynthia Boylan  |  Dec 11, 2014  |  0 comments

Are you itching to digitize your film-based medium format images? HP Marketing Corp. is now offering the new Braun FS 120 medium format scanner designed for that exact task.

David B. Brooks  |  Feb 01, 2011  |  0 comments

A new CanoScan flat-bed photo scanner, the 9000F, has an exceptionally high 9600x9600 optical resolution. It’s priced right, with a list of $249, but how well does it work and what quality of scans does it reproduce from 35mm film?

Jon Canfield  |  Jul 01, 2007  |  0 comments

With so much digital in evidence, you'd think scanning would be a hot area at PMA. At least, I was hoping it would be. There's a big gap in the middle when it comes to ways to get your film into the digital realm. You've got the low end, typically a normal flat-bed scanner that's optimized for reflective scans and does a mediocre job of scanning...

George Schaub  |  Nov 08, 2013  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2013  |  1 comments

Designed for professionals, enthusiasts, schools, and clubs, the OpticFilm 120 scanner from Plustek ($1999) can handle negative and positive film, including 35mm filmstrips, individual 35mm slides, and medium format film up to 6x12cm format. The scanner contains an eight-element glass lens and can deliver up to 10,600dpi optical resolution, with a claimed 4.01 dynamic range using the supplied SilverFast software’s Multi-Exposure function. The tabletop scanner is about the size of a six-slice restaurant toaster (about 8x14.5x7.5”) and is supplied with a complete set of very well-constructed film holders, an IT8 calibration target, and a full version (not a trial) of SilverFast Ai Studio 8 software.

David B. Brooks  |  Sep 01, 2010  |  4 comments

I’ve been testing and reporting on film scanners for almost 20 years, and names like Imacon, Kodak, Nikon, Microtek, and UMAX all come to mind.

George Schaub  |  Jan 03, 2014  |  0 comments

This is a portrait of my Great-Uncle Syl, taken in the late 1940’s, a print that sat in a storage box until last year. Now Syl’s on the web here, shared with family via an e-mail attachment, and will soon be part of a photo book of the family history. If you’ve got boxes of old photos it’s easy to share them too. For those thinking about such a project, and who haven’t scanned before, here are some basic FAQ’s that might get you started.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Jun 21, 2017  |  0 comments

Welcome to our newest photography video series: the Shutterbug Showcase. In these videos, we’ll be doing hands-on demonstrations of some of the hottest photo gear on the market right now. For our first Shutterbug Showcase clip, we’re looking at the Epson FastFoto FF-640, which is the world’s fastest photo scanner.

David B. Brooks  |  Jul 01, 2008  |  0 comments

Microtek is well-known for making both consumer- and professional-level scanners. For a good part of their long history in the business their pro flat-bed scanners have offered a unique capability that combines a dedicated film scanner with legal-size, 8.5x14" flat-bed reflective scanning. The new ArtixScan M1 Pro includes a very modern 4800dpi optical Sony CCD sensor array...

David B. Brooks  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Some believe film is dead, but I get as many e-mails from photographers as ever asking about film scanning. The reason is that digital cameras have brought more photographers into using a computer for photography so now they want to access the film images they have made over the years in digital format. A new, dedicated 35mm scanner model is a rarity these days; none of the...

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