LATEST STORIES

Jon Canfield  |  Dec 01, 2006  |  0 comments

In my last column I covered using Unsharp Mask to sharpen your images for output, whether print or screen. This time, we'll go a step further and talk about selective sharpening. Why would you want to use selective sharpening? It's the ideal choice when working on portraits, where you want to keep the skin smooth but have good detail and focus on the eyes. You'll...

George Schaub  |  Dec 01, 2006  |  0 comments

Is it possible that one day we might be able to bypass basic, global in computer editing for our digital images, and rely instead on the powerful on-board microprocessors in future digital SLRs? That's the implication of some of the new features in Nikon's latest enthusiast-aimed camera, the D80. Priced at $999 (body only) list, with a kit including an 18-135mm...

Shutterbug Staff  |  Dec 01, 2006  |  0 comments

We welcome your comments on articles, photo and digital events, feedback on how we're doing, constructive criticism, and friendly advice. We reserve the right to edit for brevity and to paraphrase longer comments if necessary. You can send us letters by US mail at Editor, News & Notes, Shutterbug Magazine, 1419 Chaffee Dr., Suite #1, Titusville, FL 32780, or by e-mail...

Monte Zucker  |  Dec 01, 2006  |  0 comments

One light pattern for everything--that's what I teach. Boring, you say? I don't think so. It simply makes life easy. With one light pattern, two poses (Feminine and Basic), and three camera positions (you place the lens where it sees either full face, 2/3, or profile) you're free to express your creativity.

The light pattern you see in most of...

Brad Perks  |  Dec 01, 2006  |  2 comments

Firefalls were waterfalls once created with fire in Yosemite National Park. A large fire was started atop Glacier Point and red-hot embers were pushed off a shear granite wall in the evening. It was Yosemite's version of fireworks. Park officials learned it was a fire hazard in the 1960s and the practice was stopped.

These days you can see and photograph a...

David B. Brooks  |  Dec 01, 2006  |  0 comments

With a digital camera, a computer, and a printer, all that remains to make photo prints is an application that will access and open your photo files and send the images to the printer. That's simple enough. But there are obviously other issues--what about color matching between screen and print? How do you get to the pictures you want printed? There are also questions...

Ron Eggers  |  Dec 01, 2006  |  0 comments

Electronic flash functionality continues to expand with one of the major innovations over the last few years being portability. For a long time the options were either using professional lighting gear in the studio, or using makeshift portable-powered lighting setups on location. Frequently, photographers would jerry-rig battery-powered auxiliary on-camera flash units to work with...

C.A. Boylan  |  Dec 01, 2006  |  0 comments

A gift guide for the photographer in your life (or a hint for those who don't know what accessory you want this holiday season).

Each year we present our annual guide to some of the best photography and imaging books published in the past year. This year's selection spans a wide variety of monographs, essays, and contemplations on the state of the world, all...

Robert E. Mayer  |  Dec 01, 2006  |  0 comments

Here Is A Quick Tip List On Letters For The HELP! Desk:
Please confine yourself to only one question per letter. Both postal letters and e-mails are fine, although we prefer e-mail as the most efficient form of communication. Send your e-mail queries to editorial@shutterbug.com with Help in the...

The Editors  |  Dec 01, 2006  |  1 comments

In this issue we asked our contributors to give us their thoughts on what the future holds, be it gear, technology, or trends in photography. We received a wide range of opinions, from those proclaiming that film is finally dead to those who see diversity in image making as important. There's no doubt that many people still use and enjoy working with film. But there's...

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