Software How To

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Howard Millard  |  Jul 24, 2015  |  0 comments

In this article I’ll encourage you to put on your artist’s smock and dig in to your vault of photos to create new versions of them with options that look like hand made watercolor, oil, pen and ink, woodcut, serigraph (silkscreen) and pencil sketch. No drawing is required.

Jack Neubart  |  Jul 07, 2015  |  0 comments

Lightroom has been always available as retail standalone software that you buy, install, update, and pay to upgrade when applicable. Well, that has changed, in part, thanks to the Adobe Creative Cloud, which unleashed a torrent of cloud-integrated apps, among them Lightroom CC.

Jon Canfield  |  May 26, 2015  |  0 comments

Sometimes a straight photograph isn’t the goal when we capture images. Thanks to a number of programs, you can take your photograph beyond the ordinary and turn it into a work of art with a few clicks of the mouse. One such program is Topaz Simplify (www.topazlabs.com, $39.99). Running standalone or as a plug-in for Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom or Apple’s Aperture, Simplify has a number of presets ranging from cartoon look to wood carvings to help you get started. Additionally, if you create your own look, you can save it as a preset and share those presets with other users.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 04, 2015  |  0 comments

You don’t need three magic wishes to make your Mac or PC more digital photography-friendly. Here are five ways anyone can upgrade their computer to improve the speed and efficiency of Photoshop, expand storage space for all those Raw image files, add room for unlimited back-ups of your photo archive and make the whole shebang more secure—without touching a screwdriver.

Dan Havlik  |  Feb 20, 2015  |  0 comments

Do you want to learn more about Photoshop but don’t have a lot of money to do it? Well, how does "free" sound? That’s the price for over four dozen online Photoshop and Lightroom classes being offered free-of-charge at CreativeLive next week.

Steve Bedell  |  Feb 06, 2015  |  1 comments

I’ve been using PortraitPro since the first edition and now the company behind this popular retouching software, Anthropics Technology, has released Version 12, which includes a variety of updates, both major and minor. PortraitPro 12 can operate as a stand-alone and a Photoshop/Lightroom/Aperture plug-in. To get started in PortraitPro 12 (PP12), you open an image with one or several people in it and the software automatically analyzes and outlines each face. The software then magically goes about retouching the faces one at a time.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Feb 05, 2015  |  0 comments

Wouldn’t it be great if you could resize a batch of images simply by right-clicking them and selecting their new dimensions from a menu? Windows users now can—even on 64-bit machines running Windows 8.1.

Jack Neubart  |  Dec 12, 2014  |  0 comments

I’ve worked with DxO's OpticsPro imaging software for several years and have watched this program evolve and make great strides as a Raw image converter. What the new DxO OpticsPro 10 version of the software brings to the table is a cadre of new features and improvements. But are these enough to catapult this software into the top tier, or is it still playing catch-up?

Howard Millard  |  Nov 24, 2014  |  0 comments

Yes, you know that the tools and filters in Adobe Photoshop and Elements can do many amazing things, but did you know that they can empower you to make your own planets? If you have yearned to create and rule your own worlds (and who hasn’t?), then pull up some of your images and fire up Elements or Photoshop. We are going to create a galaxy of new worlds.

Howard Millard  |  Sep 30, 2014  |  1 comments

Are you someone who appreciates the richtones, colors and textures of 19th and 20th century alternative photo processes? With onOne Software’s Perfect B&W (www.ononesoftware.com), you can imbue your own images with these classic looks, and you won’t have to spend days in the darkroom to do it. Options include Platinum and Palladium, the warm beige tones and mottled surface of Calotype, the blue hues of Cyanotype, the buff tones of an Albumen print, the velvety reds of a warm Carbon print, even the look of a Tintype and many more.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 25, 2014  |  0 comments

Adobe announced Photoshop Elements 13 and Premiere Elements 13. Both have cool new features. If you’re a user of version 12, should you upgrade? The answer is: it all depends. Here’s the advice I give my friends.

Howard Millard  |  Sep 24, 2014  |  0 comments

If you are an aficionado of the rich tones and subtle gradations of fine black and white and toned images, Tonality Pro 1.0 from Macphun is a tool you will want to try. For Mac only,  the Tonality black-and-white photo converter is available as a stand-alone and as a plug-in for Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom, and Elements, as well as Apple Aperture.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 04, 2014  |  0 comments

Last month readers enjoyed our Easy Photo Tip that explained how to zoom during exposure to create an exciting special effect. But a few readers had trouble mastering the technique. Here’s a way to achieve nearly the same results using Photoshop Elements 12.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Aug 22, 2014  |  0 comments

Many features of Photoshop Elements can be customized to suit your liking. Surprisingly, some experienced users overlook this powerful capability. A great place to start is at the Preferences menu. This screen shot is from the Mac version, but the same concept applies to Win as well as full-blown Photoshop products.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Aug 19, 2014  |  0 comments

HDR stands for High Dynamic Range. What this refers to is the digital sensor’s ability (or lack of ability) to render good detail in both the highlights and the shadows in a photograph. Our eye/brain combination is extremely sophisticated, and as we look at a contrasty scene (such as a landscape in noon sunlight) the detail in the shadows and in the bright sunny areas is quite clear to us. A photograph will not look the same as we see it.

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