Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Dec 01, 2009 0 comments

There are plenty of other good (but significantly slower) 21mm and 24/25mm lenses on the market, almost all cheaper, smaller, lighter, and exhibiting less distortion than the two under discussion here.

Filed under
Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Sep 01, 2009 0 comments

Kodak’s new Ektar 100 is a film of unparalleled fine grain, very high sharpness, and excellent color rendition.

Filed under
Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2009 1 comments

Every photokina, we are assigned a category that for want of a better term we call “weird and wonderful.” It’s stuff that doesn’t easily fit into any other category, or differs so much from the mass of its competitors that it deserves special mention.

Some products are just bizarre: we’ll come to what we thought was the most bizarre trend at the end...

Filed under
Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Nov 01, 2008 1 comments

If you own and use an M-series Leica, a Zeiss Ikon, or a bayonet-mount Voigtländer Bessa, Leica’s 16-18-21mm Tri-Elmar is so staggeringly desirable that it is almost easier to list the reasons for not buying one than to list its advantages—though these are easy enough to list, too. It is compact, sweet handling, sharp, contrasty, rangefinder-coupled, unbelievably convenient, and...

Filed under
Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Understatement almost always speaks louder than overstatement; or if not louder, then generally with more authority. The four new Leica Summarits, for M-series Leicas, Zeiss Ikons, and Voigtländer Bessas, are about as far from ostentatious as you can get; they are merely first-class tools for the photographer who knows what he or she is doing.

Neither the...

Filed under
Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Film photographers are a cantankerous and ungrateful crew, often greeting revised films with suspicion and resentment instead of hope and pleasure. To some extent this is understandable, because they usually have to establish new development times and possibly new exposure indices, too; but the manufacturers' claimed improvements are usually honest, and without them...

Filed under
Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Apr 01, 2007 19 comments

Pick up the new Bessa R3M (or R2M--only the viewfinders differ) and it takes you back in time. At a solid 430 gm (a fraction over 15 oz) it has the heft and overall feel of a high-quality camera from the 1950s or '60s. Appropriately, it is the best Bessa yet, produced to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the founding of Voigtländer, and is engraved...

Filed under
Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

The name says it all: Rollei's ScanFilm 400CN Pro is an ISO 400 color negative film (Kodak C-41 compatible) for scanning, rather than for wet printing. The big difference is that the orange mask, incorporated in almost all color negative films since the 1950s, is omitted: it just isn't needed if you are scanning.

On the other hand, the orange mask is no...

Filed under
Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2007 0 comments

When Shutterbug reporters are covering photokina, we understandably concentrate on what's new, and we each have our own assigned ranges of subjects. As a result, even after allowing for my "Weird Stuff" category, a number of really useful items and trends can either fall into the gaps between our coverage--"I thought you would be covering...

Filed under
Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Sep 01, 2006 1 comments

Is there still a demand for an entry-level film SLR camera? The folks at Voigtländer seem to think so, evidenced by their new VSL 43. It is very much an entry-level SLR, with a manually set (but completely battery-dependent) shutter from 1/2 sec to 1/2000 sec, flash sync at 1/60 sec, manual focusing, manual diaphragm, and manual film advance. There is a through-lens meter...

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading