The Editors

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The Editors Posted: Jul 01, 2004 9 comments

Vacation photos are often some of the most boring collections known to viewer. Who among us hasn't had to suffer through an overly long slide show (via traditional projector or computer "slide show"), or envelope after envelope of prints when a friend returns from a vacation? Here are a few tips to keep your friends from suffering this fate.

Vacation Tips

1. Take plenty of film...

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The Editors Posted: May 01, 2004 0 comments

Traveling is a popular pastime, especially among photographers. In many ways "travel photography" is just like photography at home: good exposure is still good exposure, good composition is still good composition, etc. But there are some things traveling photographers have to consider that don't affect at-home photography.

One of course, is that you're traveling.

According to the TSA...

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The Editors Posted: Feb 01, 2004 27 comments

People are among the most popular photo subjects. This month's lesson presents some easy ways to produce better people shots.

1. Don't Just Sit There...
Static portraits—with the subject just slouched there, or stiffly posed, are not terribly appealing. It generally pays to play director as well as photographer when you're photographing people.
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The Editors Posted: Dec 01, 2003 0 comments

Digital SLRs Heat
Up: Going Hybrid Gets More Attention


First to the obvious...the digital SLR market is going to explode.
With the recent introduction of the Canon Digital Rebel model the $1000...

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The Editors Posted: Dec 01, 2003 0 comments

As winter arrives, so do incredible photo opportunities. Photography is photography, but here are some things you should consider about shooting in wintertime.

1. Exposing Snow
Short-answer quiz: What color is snow? White, right? Well, in our mind's eye it is. In the real world, though, it can be white (in bright sun), gray or blue (in open shade), or even pink (if your...

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The Editors Posted: Oct 01, 2003 0 comments

Ways to be bright when it gets dark.

Low-light photography can yield some amazingly striking and unusual images. But it also presents a problem. You need a fast enough shutter speed to prevent camera-shake-induced image blurring, and sometimes to "freeze" a moving subject. You often need to shoot at a small enough aperture to provide adequate depth of field. You want to use the...

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The Editors Posted: Sep 01, 2003 3 comments

Some ways to help offset the cost of your favorite pastime

There are lots of way to make money in photography, including selling and trading photo gear, processing film and making prints for other photographers, scanning images (slides, negatives and prints) and putting them on CDs for others, retouching photos, copying and restoring old photos, collecting collectible photographs...

The Editors Posted: Aug 01, 2003 1 comments

Sun & Games Fun with the sun...and more

1. Sun Stars
Your wide-angle lens at its smallest aperture can turn the sun into a star in your photos—fitting, since the sun actually is a star. The effect occurs because the tiny aperture diffracts the incoming light rays a lot. This diffraction causes the star effect. You can include the sun as a compositional. Photo by...

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The Editors Posted: Aug 01, 2003 8 comments

Tips and ideas to improve your action photos

You need two things to get good action photos: some basic action-shooting skills, and some knowledge of the activity you're photographing. The skills include panning, peak action, follow-focusing, prefocusing and developing a sense of timing. The...

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The Editors Posted: Jun 01, 2003 0 comments

Best Of Show

Fujifilm FinePix F700
Although I was not covering digital cameras, I could not resist checking out one model, the new Fujifilm FinePix F700. Encased in a handsome aluminum body, this camera is not only packed with advanced SLR-type...

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