Peter K. Burian

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jan 01, 2009 1 comments

The primary emphasis was on D-SLRs during the photokina 2008 show, but many new digicams with integral lenses were introduced, including some inexpensive models strictly for quick snapshooting. While those may find eager buyers, I’ll concentrate on cameras intended for the photo enthusiast. In these categories, only a few trends became obvious, starting with resolution: 13- and 14-megapixel...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

Because of the increasing number of D-SLRs with full-frame sensors, Tamron is upgrading several of their multi-platform lenses to the Digitally Integrated standard. The most recent model, the 70-200mm f/2.8 Di, is optimized for D-SLRs regardless of the sensor size but also provides outstanding results with 35mm SLRs. This zoom has benefited from several improvements, including closer focusing...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

Until recently, 10 megapixels was the norm among the enthusiast-level D-SLRs but that changed with the introduction of Nikon’s 12-megapixel D300. Pentax was the first to move to even higher resolution with their 14.6-megapixel model, the K20D, followed by Sony with their 14.2-megapixel Alpha A350. Aside from a 4.6 million increase in effective pixels, the Pentax K20D boasts some other...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

The Olympus D-SLR system always included a series of pro-caliber lenses targeting serious photographers working with the E-1 pro camera. Since the introduction of the newer E-3, Olympus has also unveiled three high-grade zooms, the first in the Zuiko Digital line with Supersonic Wave Drive (SWD) autofocus. Designed to provide the ultimate in AF performance, this trio offers wide apertures...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Oct 01, 2008 1 comments

First announced as a "product under development" in September 2006, the DP1 finally became available 18 months later and it was worth the wait. Aside from solving some image quality issues, the engineers also modified the specifications, delivering a better camera than we had initially expected. In spite of the compact size, this is not a typical point-and-shoot...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

Billed as the "world's smallest digital SLR," this Olympus model is an upgraded version of the E-410 with several benefits. These include a slightly larger (2.7") LCD screen with better display quality, more versatile autofocus in Live View, plus support for wireless off-camera TTL flash. Image quality has also been improved slightly with a tweaked sensor...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Earlier this year, Sony became the most prolific D-SLR manufacturer by announcing four cameras within a two-week period. This included a pro model, due later this year, that had scant specs available at press time. I was able to extensively test the other three, which are quite similar in that they all start from the same "base": the entry-level 10-megapixel A200...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

As digital camera resolution is increasing, memory card manufacturers are keeping up, releasing new products with greater speed and storage capacity. Whether you shoot raw or the finest JPEGs, there's definitely a benefit to using the fastest memory card. The extra speed is useful primarily for greater burst depth--more frames in a long series--but also for shorter...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

Considering the many D-SLRs that are introduced each year, it's no surprise that virtually every lens manufacturer is also expanding its line of new products. That includes both digital-only lenses--for cameras with a typical small sensor--and multi-platform lenses suitable for any SLR. The latter are particularly important now because of the increasing number of...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

Although the D-SLR category is growing more rapidly, digicams with integral lenses still outsell the larger cameras by roughly 10 to 1. That's primarily because of the lower price and particularly the greater portability. Even the most serious photographer usually wants a pocket-size camera--with built-in lens and flash--that they can carry most anywhere.
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