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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 01, 2004 1 comments

It's a safe bet that Daryl Hawk won't be looking for an assistant any time soon. When he leaves family, friends, and the commercial, portrait, and advertising photography business he runs out of his Connecticut studio in order to pursue images...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Feb 01, 2007 2 comments

I went into this determined not to portray fine art photographer Chris Faust as some sort of oddity because, lo and behold, he still goes into the darkroom. And as a photography teacher, he encourages others to do it, too.

But when I said, "I'm not going to approach this story as if you were an oddity in the age of digital," he stopped me with...

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jun 02, 2015 0 comments

We assumed the first thing Jim Graham does in order to create his elegant landscape images is decide how to isolate his subjects from distracting backgrounds to achieve the always-desired single subject, clearly defined.

We were wrong. The first thing he does is ask himself: What do I see? Then he asks: How do I use the camera to communicate the feeling I have about what I see?

 

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

In the early days of digital imaging, we were promised much. Suppliers, manufacturers, photo writers, and early-adopter photographers talked about how digital would allow us do more with photographs. We'd be able to see them instantly, send them quickly, and, most important to the serious-minded among us, control them creatively. Digital cameras and the digital process would...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 01, 1999 0 comments

A portrait is "a pictorial
representation," according to our dictionary. Right, but a bit
limited for our purposes; a snapshot is a pictorial representation,
but we ask a portrait to carry a bit morefreight.

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 17, 2015 0 comments

Nope, editorial and advertising photographer Jody Dole doesn’t go down to the dump to look for subject matter. He’s more a flea market and tag sale type, and it was at the former that he met a picker who had, in Dole’s words, “really interesting junk—and an eye for interesting things.” Which is why Dole stops by at the guy’s place now and then, or vice versa, and an interesting thing or two changes hands.

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 01, 1999 0 comments

For years we've been asking professional photographers a variation of the same question: what does it take to be a pro? We may ask, "What's the secret of your success?" (as if it were a secret); or, simply, "What is it that...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jan 01, 2001 0 comments

It's an old antique store--okay, you can call it a junk shop--by the side of the road in Delaware, and photographer Tony Sweet drives by a lot on his way to the coast from his home in Baltimore. And it's a great place to take pictures simply because it...

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Sep 01, 1999 0 comments

The idea is as old as composition itself: lead the viewer into the picture.

"If there's any hesitation on the part of the viewer, the picture fails," says nature photographer Tony Sweet. "Viewers should go right...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 01, 1999 0 comments

"A lot of what we do as nature photographers is spend time looking around for places to go when the light is right," Tony Sweet says. And, once those places have been found, waiting around for the right light to put in an appearance.

...

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