George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 30, 2007 0 comments

What Happened to My Images ??!!



Corrupted Disks and Rescue Strategies

by George Schaub

I am not sure if it's happened to you, but it's happened to me.
After having spent an afternoon shooting with my digital camera everything suddenly
stopped. While the counter in my camera LED showed that I hadple...

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

There's no doubt that digital allows you to blithely shoot away without concern for film and processing expense and to record every possible angle and compositional permutation, with bracketing to boot. In that, it has freed the image from the implied cost of every snap of the shutter--not to worry, you paid for most of that up front. Now what you get to spend is time...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 07, 2014 Published: Jan 01, 2014 1 comments
These days you could consider any image as a special effect, what with the massive amount of processing that goes on inside the camera prior to it being written on the memory card. But that’s pretty much assumed and not even considered “special” anymore.
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George Schaub Posted: Apr 12, 2005 0 comments

For those who have been working with the latest digital cameras--both
integral and interchangeable lens types--you've probably seen an
option called Raw among your file formats. Unlike JPEG and TIFF, Raw is not
an acronym and therefore we don't capitalize it, and is just what it states--the
"raw" image date received by the sensor and digitized within the
microprocessor of the camera. It is not "raw" in the sense that
it is unfettered or unrecognizable, but it does take image processing software
other than what's in the plain version of some image processing programs
to see it. That Raw software converts the Raw image file format to an image
on the screen and allows you to save it to a format other than Raw--such
as TIFF or JPEG.

...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 30, 2005 0 comments

The promise of digital imaging is that you can get one-touch corrections on
your photographs, making it easy to create the best images you can from every
picture you take. The phrase: "I won't worry about white balance,
exposure or contrast, etc....I'll fix it in Photoshop" is commonly
heard, but it isn't always the best course. If you shoot in Raw mode you
can fix anything, even exposure compensation, later, but not everyone wants
to go through the steps of working with Raw converters and all those sliders
and options. That's where the supposed magic of "auto" fixes
come into play, and yes, there are times when it can do wonders. Today, cameras
even have auto red-eye fix and amazing adjustments for backlighting problems.

...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

There are quite a few differences between film and digital imaging. One main difference is that when it comes to film you are dealing with dye and density; with digital it's all a numbers game. Once exposed and developed, film has measurable and fairly fixed characteristics. With digital it's pretty much up for grabs. That's because digital images are composed of...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2008 0 comments

Everyone has experienced the frustration of making changes to an image on the monitor until it’s just right, then seeing a print emerge only to have it too light, too dark, or, for black and white images, seeing the image color go a sickly green or other color cast. It would make sense that what you see on the monitor screen matches the print, but that’s not always or, for some, often...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2005 0 comments

The query, "Who's your favorite photographer?" has to be among the top three icebreakers (can you name the other two?) amid photographers. It's not a popularity contest, per se, but more a seeking of what images inspire you and whose point of view you admire and, at one point in your creative work, who you might like to emulate. This might vary according to...

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