George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2010 0 comments

It’s pretty easy these days to do what seemed a monumental task in the past—create a website that makes navigation easy, displaying and selling images simple, and that does not require eight-weeks attendance in an HTML class in some bleak basement classroom of an adult ed evening program to get to stage one. True, there are plenty of browser and editing programs that can create a web...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2008 9 comments

Google “photographer” and you get, as of this writing, about 140 million (!) possible URLs; do the same for “photographer web pages” and you get over 25 million! The motivation for creating a web page with your photographs is legion: it can be used to display your work to a worldwide audience; showcase work to potential clients; license images for sale in publications and...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2011 2 comments

Many photographers start their careers photographing weddings or doing portraits “on the side.” Me, too. While I was engaged in other aspects of the craft, I worked as a weekend warrior shooting weddings and social events to help raise money for new gear (and pay the rent). I set up a small studio with seamless paper on rolls in my one-bedroom apartment and would do tabletop...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2006 0 comments

While we did feature some crystal ball gazing in our December issue, I thought I'd use this space to discuss some of the matters we'll be exploring and some of the trends we'll be watching as we move into 2006. In the last year we've done our best to keep you up-to-date on the issues and changes that have taken place in photography, and there's no...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 28, 2004 0 comments

Westcott has recently made a new addition to its line of Soft Box Light Modifiers
by introducing the New Masters Brush. The New Masters allows users to create more
defined shadowing, which enhances depth and adds contour.



Westcott worked directly on the design with Master Photographer Ken Cook, a third
generation family studio owner with over 50 years of experience. The specially
designed multi layer front panel along with the Barn Door and internal baffle
creates a 2 f-Stop differential between the center or the heart of the light and
the outer edges. This allows users to achieve the lighting patterns created by
the old Masters of Photography using split, broad and short lighting, including
all the variations of Rembrandt and Butterfly Lighting.
...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2010 0 comments

The latest manifestation of desktop back-up devices from Western Digital, the My Book Studio Edition II, makes what might have seemed to some as a difficult task—backing up and retrieving image and other files—quite easy.

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 04, 2013 6 comments
If you were a detective you would look for motive as a prime clue as to who did the deed, but how many times have you really thought about your own motivation for making photographs? The mystery all photographers eventually attempt to solve is: just motivates me to make pictures and to process images in my own unique way? Kind of like trying to figure out the meaning of life, I guess, and using your photography to help you answer a small part of that question.
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George Schaub Posted: Jan 30, 2007 0 comments

What Happened to My Images ??!!



Corrupted Disks and Rescue Strategies

by George Schaub

I am not sure if it's happened to you, but it's happened to me.
After having spent an afternoon shooting with my digital camera everything suddenly
stopped. While the counter in my camera LED showed that I hadple...

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

There's no doubt that digital allows you to blithely shoot away without concern for film and processing expense and to record every possible angle and compositional permutation, with bracketing to boot. In that, it has freed the image from the implied cost of every snap of the shutter--not to worry, you paid for most of that up front. Now what you get to spend is time...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 07, 2014 Published: Jan 01, 2014 1 comments
These days you could consider any image as a special effect, what with the massive amount of processing that goes on inside the camera prior to it being written on the memory card. But that’s pretty much assumed and not even considered “special” anymore.

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