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Editor Feb 21, 2008 33 comments
At this year’s PMA we saw a new generation of “smart” cameras that incorporate sophisticated metering and focusing technology that almost take many of the “craft” decisions out of the hands of photographers. Do you think this is good or bad for photography, and will you base your purchasing decision on how “smart” the camera might be?
Please comment briefly on your reaction to these “smart” cameras.
1) Yes I think this is a good direction for camera technology and I will seek one out to help me make better pictures.
86% (446 votes)
2) No I like to make settings and exposure decisions myself. I like technology but this seems to take the fun out of photograph
4% (21 votes)
3) I wouldn’t base my “buy” decision on how “smart” the camera might be, but I wouldn’t reject it out of hand just because it co
10% (50 votes)
Total votes: 517
Editor Jan 22, 2008 50 comments
There's a continuing debate about the use of "legacy glass" on modern DSLR cameras, that is, using lenses of "pre-digital" manufacture on today's cameras. Some insist that only modern lenses "dedicated to digital" will yield optimum results, while others disagree. Aside from the multiplication factor, have you worked with older lenses on your newer DSLR and found they give good results, or not?
Please comment briefly on your experiences with using both post- and pre-digital manufactured lenses.
Yes, and I see a marked difference in image quality when using "digital dedicated" lenses.
87% (556 votes)
Yes, and I see no difference, or no marked difference that would convince me not to continue using the older lenses.
11% (73 votes)
No, I only work with digital dedicated lenses.
1% (8 votes)
Total votes: 637
Editor Dec 04, 2007 75 comments
Now that Nikon has announced that it will indeed be coming out with a full-frame sensor DSLR, does a full-frame sensor matter that much to you, or do you feel the current sensor size in DSLRs deliver the goods?
Please comment briefly on your thoughts on Nikon's move to offer a full-frame sensor and how it might affect your buying decisions in the future.
Having a larger sensor size is important to me and I think will make a big difference in image results.
83% (567 votes)
The current so-called APS-C sensor size delivers the goods, and right now the full-frame sensor cameras are way too expensive.
14% (94 votes)
I am unlcear about the differences and need to learn more about this issue.
3% (23 votes)
Total votes: 684
Editor Nov 07, 2007 29 comments
It’s clear to DSLR photographers that shooting in Raw format has many advantages. If you shoot with a DSLR do you shoot primarily in RAW?
If you shoot in RAW please briefly comment on your workflow preferences (software.)
Yes, I do almost all my digital photography using RAW format.
97% (406 votes)
No, I do understand about RAW format but shoot in JPEG.
3% (12 votes)
I do not really see the advantage in shooting RAW.
0% (2 votes)
Total votes: 420
Editor Oct 04, 2007 20 comments
At the recent Photo Plus show numerous companies, both printer manufacturers and "third party" paper manufacturers introduced so-called "fiber-based" inkjet papers. These emulate the look and feel of fiber based silver papers of the past. The ironic aspect of this is that many of the people to whom these papers are being marketed have never printed in the darkroom, and have little understanding of the difference between fiber and RC papers. If you are doing your own inkjet printing in your home or studio, do you relate to what their marketing message?
Briefly comment on what papers you currently use for inkjet printing.
Yes, I have done darkroom work in the past and can relate to what, for example, it means to have a "double weight glossy dried m
96% (551 votes)
No, I have not done darkroom work and use other criteria and references for paper selection.
2% (9 votes)
I am not sure how to judge the merits of a particular paper, and need to learn more about paper's various aspects.
3% (15 votes)
Total votes: 575
Editor Sep 11, 2007 54 comments
With Nikon's recent announcement of a "full frame" DSLR, do you think that we are beginning to see a break between advanaced amateur and "pro" DSLRs based upon sensor size? If so, how does this affect your purchasing decision when shopping for a DSLR?
Please briefly describe your purchasing decision when shopping for a DSLR?
No, it makes no difference--as long as I have enough resolution (megapixels) to get the images I want.
71% (291 votes)
Yes, I will look forward to getting a "full frame" sensor DSLRs.
6% (26 votes)
I would prefer working with a full frame DSLR, but only if prices come way down.
23% (93 votes)
Total votes: 410
Editor Aug 14, 2007 40 comments
More and more digital cameras have a “monochrome” mode for making digital images in black and white, in camera. But you can also “convert” images later easily enough in Raw converter or from JPEGs. If you do use digital for black and white photography, how do you prefer to do it?
Please briefly describe your black and white digital workflow.
I use the Monochrome mode so I can see the results in black and white in the field.
64% (191 votes)
I shoot in Raw and make the conversion later using my Raw converter.
10% (31 votes)
I shoot in either Raw or JPEG and convert to black and white in my main image editing software.
26% (77 votes)
Total votes: 299
Editor Jul 23, 2007 22 comments
There are numerous options for learning about photography these days, including workshops, college courses, online courses and self-learning through books and articles. How do you keep up with the newest technology, techniques and tools?
Please comment briefly on how you continue to educate yourself on all the changes occuring in photography.
I am self-taught and use books, magazines, peers and online resources.
94% (216 votes)
I attend workshops and/or courses at a school.
5% (11 votes)
I use online courses from online schools, web sites and manufacturers.
1% (3 votes)
Total votes: 230
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Editor Jun 19, 2007 62 comments
Sensor dust” has become a real issue for some digital photographers, reminiscent of the days when you had to spot each print when enlarging if your enlarger or negative was not flawlessly clean. There are numerous ways to deal with this, with prevention being the best, but there are also “dust reference” images, dust removal in processing and even dust shake-off mechanics in cameras. Do you find that you have “dust issues” with your DSLR?
Briefly comment on your solution to dealing with dust on your DSLR sensor.
No I have not noticed it, yet.
75% (69 votes)
Yes, and it’s a pain in the neck.
17% (16 votes)
Yes, but I have developed a successful strategy to deal with it.
8% (7 votes)
Total votes: 92
Editor Jun 19, 2007 0 comments
Sensor dust” has become a real issue for some digital photographers, reminiscent of the days when you had to spot each print when enlarging if your enlarger or negative was not flawlessly clean. There are numerous ways to deal with this, with prevention being the best, but there are also “dust reference” images, dust removal in processing and even dust shake-off mechanics in cameras. Do you find that you have “dust issues” with your DSLR?
Briefly comment on your solution to dealing with dust on your DSLR sensor.
No I have not noticed it, yet.
74% (266 votes)
Yes, and it’s a pain in the neck.
17% (62 votes)
Yes, but I have developed a successful strategy to deal with it.
8% (30 votes)
Total votes: 358