Vote
Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Editor Nov 09, 2004 32 comments
More manufacturers and "third party" lens makers are introducing "digital-dedicated" lenses for their digital SLRs, which are smaller and lighter, but cannot be used on their film SLR counterparts because of the smaller image circle they throw. When considering a lens for your digital SLR, is it important that it work just as well on your film SLR?
Briefly comment on your opinion of the trend toward digital-dedicated lenses.
Yes, as I still shoot with both film and digital SLRs.
68% (63 votes)
No, the weight and size benefits outweigh any double duty capability, and I have switched entirely to digital.
23% (21 votes)
No, as I have separate outfits for both my film and digital SLRs.
10% (9 votes)
Total votes: 93
Editor Nov 13, 2008 138 comments
Kodak recently announced a new 100 speed color negative film, Ektar 100, said to have the finest grain of any film yet. This brings up a question we all would like answered: Do you still shoot film at all? And if not, when was the last time you exposed film?
Briefly comment on your reaction to Kodak's announcement of a new color negative film.
I never stopped shooting film.
47% (291 votes)
I do not work with film anymore.
30% (187 votes)
I shoot film rarely, but still have my film cameras and sometimes shoot a roll or two.
23% (145 votes)
Total votes: 623
Editor Jun 19, 2007 0 comments
Sensor dust” has become a real issue for some digital photographers, reminiscent of the days when you had to spot each print when enlarging if your enlarger or negative was not flawlessly clean. There are numerous ways to deal with this, with prevention being the best, but there are also “dust reference” images, dust removal in processing and even dust shake-off mechanics in cameras. Do you find that you have “dust issues” with your DSLR?
Briefly comment on your solution to dealing with dust on your DSLR sensor.
No I have not noticed it, yet.
74% (266 votes)
Yes, and it’s a pain in the neck.
17% (62 votes)
Yes, but I have developed a successful strategy to deal with it.
8% (30 votes)
Total votes: 358
Vote
Editor Jun 19, 2007 62 comments
Sensor dust” has become a real issue for some digital photographers, reminiscent of the days when you had to spot each print when enlarging if your enlarger or negative was not flawlessly clean. There are numerous ways to deal with this, with prevention being the best, but there are also “dust reference” images, dust removal in processing and even dust shake-off mechanics in cameras. Do you find that you have “dust issues” with your DSLR?
Briefly comment on your solution to dealing with dust on your DSLR sensor.
No I have not noticed it, yet.
75% (69 votes)
Yes, and it’s a pain in the neck.
17% (16 votes)
Yes, but I have developed a successful strategy to deal with it.
8% (7 votes)
Total votes: 92
Editor Apr 19, 2005 51 comments
As more digital SLRs become available the price will necessarily drop. If you don't own one yet, but are considering a digital SLR, and price is a strong consideration, at what price point would you make the move?
Briefly describe the top three features that an affordable digital SLR would have to have in order for you to consider it as the camera for you.
About $600
36% (38 votes)
Between $350-500
45% (48 votes)
The price is right now, but I haven't decided on which one to get.
20% (21 votes)
Total votes: 107
Mar 21, 2007 41 comments
At the recent PMA show a number of companies have announced plans to not only have WiFi cameras but also GPS capable units. Do you think that would be a useful and helpful feature in your digital camera?
Brifely describe how you might use GPS in your digital camera.
Yes, it sounds like fun.
32% (40 votes)
No, I don't need that kind of feature.
28% (35 votes)
Maybe, but I have to see how it works.
40% (51 votes)
Total votes: 126
Vote
Editor May 17, 2013 0 comments
Compact System Cameras are becoming more interesting, and popular.
I own a CSC and am pleased with results.
36% (31 votes)
I will consider one as an option to, or even a replacement for my DSLR when next in the market for a camera.
26% (22 votes)
I'll stick with my DSLR.
38% (33 votes)
Total votes: 86
Vote
Editor Feb 15, 2013 1 comments
Do "lab tests" help you make camera buying decisions?
I look at lab tests first to see if I would be at all interested in a camera.
21% (12 votes)
I rely on field tests done by a reliable reporter as most important.
9% (5 votes)
I use both lab and field tests to make buying decisions.
70% (39 votes)
Total votes: 56
Vote
George Schaub Jun 16, 2011 3 comments
Please comment briefly on your experience with image stabilization lenses in low light, with slow shutter speeds or when doing macro work.
Do you think that the stabilization trend in lenses will lessen the use of tripods for you?
Yes, with an image stabilization lens tripods are only necessary in rare instances.
8% (55 votes)
No, regardless of using image stabilization lenses, there’s simply no substitute for the image quality you get by using a tripod
28% (183 votes)
I would use both, as each has its purposes and one doesn’t necessarily cancel the use of the other.
63% (411 votes)
Total votes: 649
Vote
George Schaub Sep 14, 2011 0 comments
Please comment briefly on what wireless or network systems or devices you have interconnected in your home or studio.
Does wireless connectivity or networking play a part in your home or studio digital darkroom and printing setups?
Yes I have a printer, scanner, TV or other device set up on my home network to look at and/or work on my images.
63% (67 votes)
No, but I have wireless Internet and am thinking about getting other systems in place.
21% (23 votes)
No, I have no intention of getting involved in wireless or network setups.
16% (17 votes)
Total votes: 107