Personal Projects

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 11, 2014 0 comments
The concept is elegantly simple: place the object of choice in a location of choice; take photograph; repeat as needed. The artistry is in the stylish sensibility you bring to the project. It’s a self-assignment for the imaginative and the adventurous. A skewed sense of humor doesn’t hurt, either.
Filed under
Jason D. Page Posted: Oct 19, 2014 0 comments
In 2004 I was out late one night for a walk on the beach, as I often did to de-stress from a long day at work. This night was particularly beautiful, with a full moon shining overhead, so I decided to bring my camera and tripod along to take some oceanscapes. I found the perfect location, set up my gear, and opened the shutter of my camera for a long exposure. While the exposure was running I accidentally bumped my camera. When I checked the image and saw that the light from the moon had left a streak going across the sky I had an epiphany. My mind raced at the possibilities of using my camera and the moonlight to draw images in the sky, and from that moment on I was a light painter.
Filed under
Lou Jacobs Jr. Posted: Oct 14, 2014 0 comments
When I first saw this series of images of the little girl, I realized the photographer had carefully posed and lit the images in a delightful manner. The child portrayed in numerous styles is actually quite contemporary and lives with her parents in Melbourne, Australia. Her dad, Bill Gekas, is a professional photographer, self-taught and very adept at portraiture, though his main occupation is managing a family manufacturing business.
Filed under
William Shepley Posted: Sep 26, 2014 0 comments

In the late 1980s I took on the challenge of shooting the equestrian culture of the American West. I was passionately interested in photographing the men and women who still follow the traditions of Western horsemanship. They all share an almost mystical love of their equine counterparts and the art of riding. Over a 14-year period I seasonally photographed the Western riders and titled the work the Equestrian West.

Filed under
Wm. E. Szczepaniak Posted: Aug 23, 2014 0 comments
You have invested in camera equipment. You have sharpened your photographic skills. You even have a gallery of your photos online. Now what? The next step for many photographers is a public exhibition of their work. It is a way to be seen, to promote and market yourself and your work, and maybe, if you are lucky, even a way to sell a print or two.
Filed under
Josh Miller Posted: Aug 05, 2014 0 comments

It all started with a conversation at a family holiday with my aunt and uncle about doing a summer hiking trip in Yosemite to stay at the High Sierra Camps. These camps are supported by daily mule trains that haul in supplies, including delicious meals and luggage, thus allowing visitors to carry a light daypack while getting to enjoy the experience of a backcountry trip.

Jeff Howe Posted: Jul 18, 2014 Published: Jun 01, 2014 0 comments
Last year, I decided to take on a challenge focusing on the unique natural beauty associated with wildfires in a Florida scrub ecosystem, one of the most rare ecosystems in the state. Florida is no stranger to wildfires. Nationwide, Florida has the second highest number of wildfires annually. In 2011, it was estimated that 300,000 acres of land was burned due to over 4800 wildfires. My project was centered at Indrio Savannahs Preserve, where a 120-acre wildfire was ignited by lightning in March of 2013.
Filed under
Lorin R. Robinson Posted: Jul 01, 2014 Published: May 01, 2014 1 comments
Twenty-year-old Josh Friedman spends a lot of time underwater “playing” with sharks. It’s his belief that sharks are badly in need of better public relations to improve their image and active advocacy for their conservation.
Jay McCabe Posted: Jun 12, 2014 Published: Apr 01, 2014 0 comments
To photograph the wild horses of the Outer Banks of North Carolina you have to deal with the fact that they are indeed wild and thus not particularly welcoming of a photographer’s attention.
But first you have to deal with the Outer Banks, a 200-mile stretch of barrier islands off the coast of North Carolina. “It’s important to have an awareness of time, tide, and weather,” Lisa Cueman says of the location. “You can get into your photography, but not so much that you lose a sense of your surroundings.”
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jun 05, 2014 Published: Apr 01, 2014 1 comments
The camera Michael carries might be his Leica M6, loaded with either Ilford XP-2 or Kodak BW400CN chromogenic film and fitted with either a 35mm f/2 or 50mm f/2 Summicron lens; or his Fuji X10 point-and-shoot with its zoom lens set for the equivalent of 50mm; or his Nikon D200 or D700 with the manual 50mm f/1.4 Nikkor lens he got with his F3 back when he was in college.
Lorin R. Robinson Posted: May 02, 2014 Published: Mar 01, 2014 0 comments
Caving,” “spelunking,” “potholing.” Whatever you call it, this subterranean activity is not for everyone. There’s even a phobia that keeps some out of caves—speluncaphobia. Then, of course, there’s fear of darkness (achluophobia) and the rather more common claustrophobia—fear of no escape from small or enclosed spaces.
Lorin R. Robinson Posted: Apr 11, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 0 comments
It is probably true that a photographer, through almost single-minded devotion to a place, can help make it known, understood, and appreciated. But the converse is also true. A place can make a photographer. Its beauty, its landscape, its human dimensions, its impact on the creative spirit can mold or shape a photographer—both as artist and person. That’s been the experience of fine art photographer William Davis in his 45-year symbiotic relationship with Northern New Mexico and the small town of Taos.
Jim Corbran Posted: Apr 07, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 0 comments
The idea for Phil Pantano’s photographic series, “The American Worker,” walked into his office at a local steel mill in Lackawanna, New York, where Pantano holds a day job as a computer analyst. The man who came through the door was Jay “Elvis” Borzillieri, a fourth-generation steelworker whose father died in the mill. It doesn’t matter to the story what Elvis stopped in for that day, but when Pantano looked into his face a flash went off in his mind.
Suzanne Driscoll Posted: Apr 04, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 0 comments
Vincent van Gogh once said, “Stars are the souls of dead poets, but to become a star you have to die.” Vivian Maier (1926 - 2009) was an amateur photographer who had no desire to share her work with anyone during her life, and kept a treasure trove of over 100,000 prints, negatives, and films in five storage lockers in Chicago. By several twists of fate, they ended up in the hands of a few collectors who recognized their unique quality, and are now shown in books, documentaries, museums, and galleries throughout the world.
Susan K. Johnston Posted: Dec 04, 2013 Published: Oct 01, 2013 0 comments
A few years ago I was reorganizing a closet and discovered cardboard boxes tucked into a dark corner. Much to my surprise, I found dress boxes and shoeboxes filled with photographs from the 1940s and early ’50s. I had forgotten that when my father died I inherited his personal photographs. That afternoon and long into the night, I sat on the hallway floor looking at the pictures and reliving some of those moments. It was like discovering buried treasure, a forgotten family heirloom.

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading