Paper & Ink

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2011 2 comments

The substrate and the image often go hand in hand, with a natural tendency to choose a matte surface for one type of scene, bucolic landscapes, perhaps, a hard gloss for commercial work, and a luster for deep blacks and a fine art feel.

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Feb 01, 2011 1 comments

In our recent photokina reports (January, 2011, issue) we covered products and trends at the show. Here’s a brief follow-up on some film and paper processing items and information on friends old and new, present and gone.

In our photokina reports we mentioned Kodak’s new film, of course, and Harman’s Direct Positive paper, and...

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C.A. Boylan Posted: Feb 01, 2011 1 comments

PocketWizard MiniTT1 And FlexTT5 For Nikon
Made for use with Nikon D-SLR cameras, the MiniTT1 transmitter slides into the camera’s hot shoe and measures just 2.8x1.9x1.3”. The FlexTT5 transceiver measures 3.6x2.9x1.4”. This system can be used to control single or multiple off-camera Nikon i-TTL flash units. The firmware is upgradeable and other accessories...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2011 1 comments

OK, so I have on the meditation tape and have done my breathing exercises and now I’m ready to print on Hahnemühle’s Bamboo paper, which they dub prime for “spiritual black and white and color photography.” Made from 90 percent bamboo fibers and 10 percent cotton, and washed in “pure spring water,” the paper comes with a bit of New Age hype but at the end...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

Let’s be honest. One thing no one would have expected at photokina was a unique new black-and-white silver halide process. But that’s what we got. Well, not exactly brand new. It’s a revival of a technology that hasn’t been seen in decades, quite possibly not in the lifetime of many of our readers: direct reversal paper.

Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2010 1 comments

There are a couple of new printers aimed at the event photographer market, and there are plenty of media options as well for snapshot to fine art printers. And, the photo book industry is taking off—there were more book printing options available than ever before, both for the portrait/wedding photographer with companies like Fujifilm, HP, Kodak, and Lucidiom all having offerings in both...

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George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2010 2 comments

Part of the fun of making inkjet prints is the wide variety of printing surfaces and weights from which you can choose. You can go the budget route and have some fine papers to work with, or choose papers that have brand cachet and a price tag to match. That cachet generally pays off in a level of quality and durability that many printmakers both admire and hope to discover in their printing...

The Editors Posted: Aug 01, 2009 10 comments

The best imaging products of 2009 were voted on at the Technical Image Press Association (TIPA) General Assembly held from April 2-4, 2009 in Budapest.

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2009 0 comments

It’s kind of difficult to believe that there could be much innovation in a material that’s been used for thousands of years, but I’m always surprised at the number of new printing papers that come out each year. Of course, the traditional surface photo papers in gloss and luster finishes continue to be the most popular choices, but there is an ever-widening variety of fine art...

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 01, 2008 2 comments

Like most everything else these days the cost of "art" inkjet printing paper seems to be going through the roof, so printmakers are seeking alternatives without sacrificing quality. The perceived issue with some so-called "third-party" papers (those that do not carry the printer maker's brand, thus lack a profile installed with the original start up...

Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2008 1 comments

As would be anticipated in this ever more dominant digital world, there were very few new offerings from silver-based film and paper firms, and even less for the conventional darkroom. Here are the few items I did locate:

Fuji has the new Fujicolor Crystal Archive Preferred color reversal RA-4 process paper that's said to offer vivid color reproduction, brilliant...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

There may not have been many new printer announcements at PMA this year, but that certainly didn't affect the paper vendors from going all out with new products. It's clear that old is new again, as many of the surfaces shown mimic those of traditional darkroom days. If you're a lover of fiber-based papers, this is a great year for you with plenty of new options...

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C.A. Boylan Posted: May 01, 2008 1 comments

Tamrac's Adventure 10 Photo/Laptop Backpack
The Tamrac Adventure 10 gear carrier is a lightweight, uniquely-designed backpack that combines a functional camera bag, comfortable daypack, and computer backpack in one easy-to-carry pack. It holds camera equipment, personal items, and laptops with up to 17" screens and, for security, does not look like...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2008 1 comments

At a recent photo trade show in New York numerous paper companies showcased the latest trend in inkjet media--papers that had the look and feel of the best of past silver printing papers. The diversity of weight, base color, and texture are now quite amazing, exceeding anything we ever had in the chemical darkroom. The truth of the matter is that while there are many brands...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

It seems that every week brings at least one new paper announcement that promises to change the way we do our printing. Where a few years ago it was common to use only the paper and ink sold by the printer manufacturer, today many photographers are using third-party papers for the wider variety of surfaces and weights available.

Although media choices are still more...

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