Film & Processing

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

This article was very nearly called "9600," which is what you get if you multiply 24 by 400. Twenty-four films, that is, times ISO 400. There are at least this many, though half a dozen or so aren't available in the US. Even 18 films is however a pretty impressive number for a...

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Roger K. Bunting Posted: Sep 01, 2003 153 comments

A century and a half of research and development in photographic processing technology has given us some mighty fine materials to work with. The ease and speed of processing high quality black and white photos with today's materials is truly...

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Cris Daniels Posted: Apr 01, 2003 1 comments

Photo Retouching Techniques

The art of photography and digital imaging has always been the kind of experience where the learning process never ends. There are always new techniques, pieces of equipment, or goals for the...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Feb 01, 2003 0 comments

Still Using A Lab For B&W Prints

In the years BC (Before Color), black and white labs for amateurs were taken for granted. After that...

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Michael LaRosa Posted: Sep 01, 2002 0 comments

A coat hanger with one clothespin to hold the film on at the top and another to keep it from curling at the bottom worked well enough for me for quite some time. In my home darkroom--a large closet in the back bedroom--there is seldom a need to rush things. But when I recently purchased a new monolight...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Sep 01, 2002 0 comments

Making prints from color negatives in a home darkroom is not nearly as difficult as most folks seem to think it is. You just need to have a little understanding of the equipment and materials you are using. After that, everything else sort of falls into...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jul 01, 2001 Published: Jun 01, 2001 0 comments

Agfacolor Vista 800
Bearing a strong family resemblance, this film appears almost identical to Vista 400 in 4x6 prints. In my 8x12 enlargements, contrast appears a bit higher, an advantage in the flat light of an overcast day.

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The Editors Posted: Feb 01, 2001 1 comments

Just as when you put a new lens on your camera, loading black and white rather than color film makes you see differently. The images you make deal in the gray scale world, where tone and texture and an exciting range of light can be found. There are deep blacks, bright...

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Tom Fuller Posted: Feb 01, 2001 0 comments

Our project this month is to turn a hanging garment bag into an effective film drying cabinet. Although this is just barely a Level 2 Project (see the April 2000 issue for an explanation of my DIY complexity scale), it requires the wiring of an AC...

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Dave Howard Posted: Oct 01, 2000 0 comments

A little over a year ago, when I first conceived this article, my main idea was to dwell on after-market enlarger accessories and custom modifications. After attending several major photographic equipment shows, it has become evident that another...

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Joseph A. Dickerson Posted: Oct 01, 2000 2 comments

Now that summer is behind us and there are fewer daylight hours for shooting we're naturally spending more time in the darkroom.

But when was the last time you went through your negative...

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Tom Fuller Posted: Apr 01, 2000 0 comments

For our project this month, we will be making very inexpensive recessed lensboards for large format cameras. As a commercially-made board of this type easily goes for over $100 and our homegrown version costs about $10, I especially want to point out its...

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Jay Abend Posted: Oct 01, 1999 0 comments

Ah, the Omega D2. Every time I walk into my darkroom and see my own well-worn enlarger my mind flashes back to my college days, where the university had about 30 D2s working hard every day. Many long hours spent putting together my first black and white...

Tom Fuller Posted: Oct 01, 1999 0 comments

Here I go again dating myself, but I remember going through packs of Kodak Athena, a double-weight contact paper with a lovely brown-black image. Actually, the tone varied daily from warm to neutral depending upon the condition of my fledgling technique...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Oct 01, 1999 0 comments

All color photographic printing paper responds to only three colors of light: Red, Green, and Blue (RGB). In fact, the emulsion of color printing papers is specifically adjusted to respond best to specific wavelengths of RGB. Therefore, if certain, specific wavelengths of RGB are used to...

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