Editor's Notes

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Dan Havlik Posted: Nov 25, 2014 0 comments

Every email I receive from Shutterbug.com writer Steve Meltzer these days is sadly familiar. “We’ve lost another one,” Steve will write while sharing news of the passing of yet another photographic master. The list is staggering, all men of a certain age (in their 80s) who’ve passed away in the last month or so.

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Dan Havlik Posted: Nov 07, 2014 0 comments
“Location is everything,” the old real estate maxim goes, and I think I’ve landed in a pretty good spot. If you’re a longtime Shutterbug reader, you just might be saying to yourself now: “Who the heck is this guy and what’s he doing here?” The short answer, in case you missed last month’s Editor’s Notes, is that George Schaub stepped down as Shutterbug’s editor and I’ve taken over for him. I’ve known George for most of the time I’ve worked in the photography magazine industry, which is going on 16 years, and he’s always been someone I’ve admired.
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George Schaub Posted: Sep 30, 2014 0 comments
What happens when you get editors from 28 photo and imaging magazines from 15 countries into one room and ask them to pick the top products of 2014? As you can imagine there might be some, if you will, amiable contention, particularly in a year when so many amazing products were introduced and the advances in technology were so impressive.
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George Schaub Posted: Sep 23, 2014 0 comments

What happens when you get editors from 28 photo and imaging magazines from 15 countries into one room and ask them to pick the top products of 2014? As you can imagine there might be some, if you will, amiable contention, particularly in a year when so many amazing products were introduced and the advances in technology were so impressive.

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 06, 2014 Published: Jul 01, 2014 0 comments

There’s nothing like a trip to open your eyes afresh. Whether it’s across the state or in a new city or to far-flung places around the world, our minds react to the newness of it all and our photography follows accordingly. As a parable, when in New York my office is quite close to the Empire State Building, and when I walk by on my way home I see dozens of people pointing their cameras straight up or angling for a good view. I sometimes forget just what might have caught their eye—then I remember the grand old building that is such a NYC landmark. It’s something I walk by nearly every day, and I don’t even bother to look up. For others, though, it’s an amazing site worthy of a photo, and that’s because their eyes are open to what’s new around them.

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 29, 2014 Published: Jun 01, 2014 0 comments
This issue contains a mix of articles, including an interesting photo project, a show review of images by Garry Winogrand, and a look at the trends and opportunities of lifestyle photography, but we’ve also included numerous tests on cameras and gear that show the way toward where image capture and lighting is headed. I feel that kind of mix is a blend of the technical and the aesthetic that helps define where we are in terms of technical advancement and what Shutterbug as a magazine offers and represents. Of course, I realize that equipment is not what a great photo makes, but taking advantage of and understanding the tools at our disposal allows us to explore new avenues of our creativity.
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George Schaub Posted: May 31, 2014 Published: May 01, 2014 0 comments
Here at Shutterbug we strive to bring you a mix of product information and tests as well as the end result of using all that gear—great images by a diverse group of photographers. While some issues are more geared toward one side or the other, this one’s got a healthy helping of both.
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George Schaub Posted: May 13, 2014 Published: Apr 01, 2014 0 comments
To say that photography is technologically driven these days is an understatement. While the miracle of being able to capture an image in and of itself is still a source of amazement to me, photography has changed so radically as of late that you need a scorecard to keep up with the game. That’s the intent of this issue, to bring you up to speed on the many developments that sit under the hood in capture, storage, and image delivery.
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George Schaub Posted: Apr 07, 2014 Published: Mar 01, 2014 0 comments
Each art or craft we engage in, as participants or observers, does something for our sense of being alive, our presence in and awareness of the world. Art feeds the head and the soul and it’s an important part of what makes us human. That’s why people should be rightly upset when art is removed from the curriculum in our schools. But for photographers, one major key to that awareness is a sense and sensibility about light. That appreciation starts to build in once you start considering what to photograph and when to make an image. In many cases, if you think about it, the quality of light is often the guiding hand. The bonus is that the love of light and shadow and its levels and color stays with you even when not walking around with a camera.
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George Schaub Posted: Mar 17, 2014 Published: Feb 01, 2014 0 comments
While every image we make with a digital camera starts out as a color (RGB) image, it doesn’t preclude creating dynamic black-and-white photos from those image files. In fact, the ability to “convert” to color lends itself to producing more tonally rich images than we ever could have imagined when working with black-and-white silver materials.
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George Schaub Posted: Feb 07, 2014 Published: Jan 01, 2014 1 comments
These days you could consider any image as a special effect, what with the massive amount of processing that goes on inside the camera prior to it being written on the memory card. But that’s pretty much assumed and not even considered “special” anymore.
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George Schaub Posted: Jan 07, 2014 Published: Dec 01, 2013 0 comments
Not long ago when you wanted even a modicum of quality with the ability to interchange lenses and control over cameras and functions worthy of the craft you’d mainly have to choose among a variety of D-SLR-type cameras. While they all followed the 35mm SLR form and even modes of operation, the digital differentiator was generally the size and megapixel count on the sensor. While there certainly were variations and competitive technologies within different brands, the major split was between APS-C and so-called “full frame” (larger sensors equaling the 35mm format). Improvements tended to drift “down” from full-framers to APS-C, but there were also a number of concessions, if you will, that moved up from APS-C to the more pro-oriented models, which for some muddied the waters although body construction, shutter cycles, and other matters of concern to pros were retained in the higher-priced cameras.
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George Schaub Posted: Dec 04, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments
This month’s issue delves into the art and craft of outdoor and nature photography, as well as covers some of the kit that could help you on your way. And given that we are heading into the colder seasons, we thought it would be apt to include a sled full of articles on dealing with working and traveling in the cooler regions. We also have some gear reviews and roundups that are apt, including Jack Neubart’s look at custom straps and harnesses that allow for hands-free and freely accessible carrying solutions. And to top it off, we are very happy to offer an excerpt from Art Wolfe’s latest book, The New Art of Photographing Nature. It always pleases us to have a master on board.
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George Schaub Posted: Oct 31, 2013 Published: Oct 01, 2013 0 comments
While we cover our fair share of gear we always keep in mind what all that gear is for—producing images that speak to your vision and your desire to express your view of the world. In this issue we do just that by introducing you to a number of photographers who have taken those tools and techniques and created a group of images that focus on an important aspect of their view of the world. Tied in with those projects is a dedication to the craft and its practice, which is what often makes their images unique and noteworthy.
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George Schaub Posted: Oct 08, 2013 Published: Sep 01, 2013 0 comments
In this issue we dive deep into auxiliary lighting waters with reviews, roundups, and tips on everything from studio to location strobes to on-camera flash to flash modifiers, those items that shape and add subtlety to what might otherwise be nothing more than a large blast of light. As you’ll see, lighting solutions are quite varied, and our task is to provide an overview of some of the latest available products as well as tips on setups and using them, something our tests always emphasize.

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