Classic & Historical Cameras
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Rick Shimonkevitz Oct 01, 2004 0 comments

So you want to try large format photography but don't want to spend a lot of money? Vintage 4x5 press cameras sit forlornly on dealers' shelves everywhere, and if not in collectable shape (e.g., mint, with correct lens plus accessories) they can usually be had at bargain prices. One of the cameras I recommend, the Graflex Super...

S. "Fritz" Takeda Sep 01, 2004 0 comments

KATSUMIDO at Ginza is the biggest used camera shop in Tokyo, specializing in rare items in mint condition. KATSUMIDO is known as the most expensive and the most quality-intensive used camera boutique in Tokyo. In the central oblong showcase of the store, the best and the rarest cameras...

Roger W. Hicks Sep 01, 2004 1 comments

It's a brute: there's no doubt about that. With a 6x9cm back, 75mm lens, and finder, it's over 8" (200mm) tall and weighs well over 6 lbs or around 3 kg. That's one of the biggest, heaviest combinations, but the others...

Roger W. Hicks Jul 01, 2004 0 comments

Collecting cameras is all very well, but we can often learn more about the history of photography--and about the difficulties under which our photographic forebears labored--by looking at accessories. The Practos exposure meter is a prime example. It is one of the last of its kind, and...

Roger W. Hicks Jun 01, 2004 0 comments

Reloadable labyrinth-style cassettes are nothing new: they were launched with the original Leica when it became clear that darkroom loading and unloading was not going to be outstandingly convenient. This is why a standard load is 36; the original Leica...

Harry Price May 01, 2004 1 comments

Mamiya introduced the Super 23 in 1967 and it would be the next to the last design the company would release as part of their series of "press" cameras. The term "press camera" was already an anachronism when the model was...

Jay Abend Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

Without a doubt, 1998 was an important year for the digital camera industry. For it was in '98 that the first really good, really usable, really portable digital SLR camera hit the shelves. A joint venture between Japanese camera maker Canon and...

Roger W. Hicks Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Bewildering numbers of folding Retinas were built in Germany at the old Nagel-Werke in Stuttgart, an early Kodak acquisition. The first Type 117 Retina I appeared in 1933, and the last folders were the IB/IIC/IIIC, made from 1957-58 to 1960. Retinettes are...

Roger W. Hicks Jan 01, 2004 8 comments

"You don't actually use that thing, do you?" This was a question one reader asked me when he saw a picture of my Kowa/SIX in one of my books or magazine articles (I forget which, now). And the answer is that yes, I do, and increasingly often at that.
The...

Roger W. Hicks Dec 01, 2003 0 comments

It's hard not to fall in love with the Baby-Box even before you see the camera itself. If it's in its case, you see the sweetest little saddle-leather box just 31/2x21/5x3". It has a dinky little strap, all of 17" long from end to...

Roger W. Hicks Nov 01, 2003 0 comments

There are plenty of people who know (and care) very little about photography, but feel that their dignity requires a camera with a bit of style and elegance. Today, they are spoiled for choice. Automation makes life easy: they can buy any number of...

Roger W. Hicks Oct 01, 2003 0 comments

Anyone who reads Shutterbug regularly will know of my enthusiasm for modern Voigtländer cameras. I'm also extremely fond of the postwar Prominent 35mm leaf-shutter rangefinder camera, and I have a great (though guarded) admiration for its prewar 120 namesake, one of the most...

Roger W. Hicks Sep 01, 2003 1 comments

Robots are probably the most underrated and underpriced world
class cameras on the used market today. They are built to at least the same standards as Leicas and Contaxes--actually, they're tougher and more reliable--and yet you can...

Roger W. Hicks Aug 01, 2003 0 comments

Classic Cameras

Just hold a Pentax. That was the slogan, 30 and more years ago--and very clever it was. The light, svelte, elegant SV (also sold as the H3V) was so lovely that if you did hold one, you wanted it. Next to its...

Roger W. Hicks Jul 01, 2003 0 comments

Classic Cameras

Mechanical precision has an almost sensual pleasure of its own. Think of the buttery wind-on of a 1950s Leica M3, or the way that the lens panel of an Alpa 12 glides into place, then fits solid as a rock. Recently...