Lighting Equipment

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

Nikon’s Speedlight SB-900 takes over the reins from the SB-800 as the company’s flagship dedicated shoe-mount strobe.

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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

The Mini/Max family consists of two light banks that fit on the front of your shoe-mount flash.

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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

Safari Luminations is a family of monolights and light-modification products aimed at the new shooter or someone getting started in studio photography.

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Steve Bedell Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

Like many photographers, I am always looking for lighting devices that will improve the way my subject looks and also be very easy to use.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

When you need the power and versatility of a studio strobe for location shooting and environmental portraiture but don’t want to schlep around a large, heavy studio system, you can turn to a portable lighting kit.

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Ron Eggers Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

On-camera flash units have been around for some 50 years and now they’ve become much more sophisticated with the development of D-SLRs.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

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Guide Number (Standard Illumination Pattern, ISO 100) At 35/200mm Zoom...

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Steve Anchell Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

When I was operating a commercial studio in Hollywood, California, my prized possession was a Swiss-made Broncolor 2400 ws power pack and three lamp heads.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2009 0 comments

Whether it’s shoe-mount strobe or studio lighting, accessories of all shapes and sizes appear to be on the rise.

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Stan Sholik Posted: Jun 01, 2009 0 comments

AC-powered electronic flash units fall into two distinct categories: systems with a power pack to which individual heads are connected, and self-contained units where the power unit is a part of the head itself.

Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

Studio lighting comes in all shapes and sizes, and the lights that are new to photokina certainly support that contention. Our primary focus here is on strobe lighting, but that includes a mix of monolights and power packs (generators), and select flash heads that attach to these generators. If we can see any trend in studio strobes it is the increasing reliance on electronic components and...

Joe Farace Posted: Dec 01, 2008 0 comments

“Something you threw together in crafts class, Princess?”—Buck Rogers in the 25th century

As a kid during the 1950s, I had one of the last Buck Rogers ray guns produced. These were actually flashlights made by Norton Honer but were designed to look like Buck’s ray gun. It’s only fitting that ExpoImaging’s Ray Flash ringlight converter projects light as...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 01, 2008 0 comments

A monolight makes entering the world of studio flash photography as painless as possible. Before long you’ll find that this studio strobe will be as easy to use as your shoe-mount flash (perhaps easier) and provide undreamt of creative possibilities. Some monolights make the transition much easier. Enter the digital Interfit Stellar XD.

The Stellar XD is a...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

A monolight (or monobloc, in some circles) is a self-contained strobe--and possibly the best way to get started in studio lighting. Self-contained means it does not require an external power pack to control its various functions with all the controls housed in the body. Most monolights plug into an AC outlet, although a few are driven by a separate, external battery pack. You...

Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

I've had many opportunities to work with battery-operated studio strobe systems. My problem with them was that they were heavy and bulky, not powerful enough, or simply too costly. Then I came upon the Opus Pro OPL-L300 location kit. I immediately noted that the 300 ws monolights were compact. Then I hefted the battery pack. Hmm, not bad, I thought. I could actually carry...

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