Lenses

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Every year the PMA Show becomes increasingly digital in its scope, with fewer exhibitors of "traditional" products. The 2006 show confirmed this trend but surprisingly, most of the new lenses (of familiar brands) are of the multi-platform type: suitable for 35mm cameras and digital SLRs with small (APS-C size) or full-frame sensors. That may not prove to be a...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

If I could, I'd spend all my time hunting down bugs and lizards and any other critters small enough to fit inside a macro lens. Simply stated, I love macro. So I couldn't wait to put the new EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro lens through its paces on my Canon EOS 20D digital SLR.

As you may already know, EF-S is Canon's designation for APS-C-dedicated lenses...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Feb 01, 2006 0 comments

As digital SLR cameras have become more affordable, an increasing number of photography and imaging enthusiasts have made the shift to digital capture. But there's one common complaint--the ultra-wide angle lenses designed for 35mm systems do not produce an expansive angle of view with any of the affordable digital SLRs. Because such cameras employ a sensor that's...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jan 01, 2006 0 comments

Although many zoom lenses are labeled as "macro" that designation generally refers only to moderately close focusing ability. With a few exceptions, such zooms are not adequate for a dramatic frame-filling image unless the subject is quite large. (A few tele macro zoom lenses are capable of much higher magnification, however.) On the other hand, true macro lenses can...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2006 4 comments

If a picture is really brilliant, you don't have to worry about grain or sharpness or anything else: to quote Mike Gristwood, late of Ilford, "How much good would it do you to know the technical details of any one of Henri Cartier-Bresson's pictures?"

By the same token, if a picture is really bad, no amount of technical brilliance is going...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Jan 01, 2006 0 comments

There's one lens that's part of my 35mm/digital SLR system that I have used longest, continuously now for about 40 years. It is a homemade single-element soft-focus lens inspired by the Rodenstock Imagon lens for large format cameras. There are more images in my library of photographs made with this lens than any other. But why in this modern, high-tech world of...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

The Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM (16-35mm equivalent in 35mm parlance) was designed to cover the APS-C format, specifically the EOS 20D and both EOS Digital Rebels (plus future APS-C models). Canon's EF-S lenses (S = Short Back Focus) are physically matched to these cameras. This design also results in a smaller and lighter lens (3.5" long and less than 14 oz).

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 01, 2005 1 comments

Tamron's AF18-200mm F/3.5-6.3 lens is part of their digitally integrated (Di II) lens series that's designed for digital SLRs and is not recommended for use with cameras having image sensors larger than 24x16mm, or 35mm film cameras. The lens is available in Canon EF, Konica Minolta AF-D, Nikon AF-D, and Pentax AF mounts and is maximized for smaller-sized imaging...

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

What do you want from a 75mm f/2 lens? Whatever it is, the new APO-Summicron-M Aspheric almost certainly delivers it--except, it must be said, low cost. Perfection, or as close as modern lens design can come to it, doesn't come cheap.

For reportage, it is superb: fast, compact, and convenient. Of course, you don't normally need or expect ultimate...

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Sep 01, 2005 0 comments

Canon's 50mm f/1.2 in Leica screwmount (39mm x 26 tpi) is something of a legend. Introduced in 1957/58, it is very fast and today it is relatively affordable. The main alternatives, after all, are either Leica Noctiluxes (the 50mm f/1.2, 1966, discontinued, or the 50mm f/1, 1967, still current) or two vanishingly rare lenses introduced in 1955, the 50mm f/1.1 Nikkor and...

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Aug 01, 2005 0 comments

Until you understand the reference, "spectacle" lenses for M-series Leicas are a rich source of confusion. Are they for spectacle wearers? And why (when you see a picture) do the lenses themselves appear to be wearing spectacles?

To make life still more interesting, there are two separate reasons why some Leica lenses have "spectacles," and...

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Roger W. Hicks, All Rights Reserved

The 90mm f/2.2 Leitz Thambar is one of those few lenses that is always prefixed "legendary." Designed primarily for portraiture, it was introduced in 1935 in Leica screw fitting, 39mmx26 tpi. It seems to have been discontinued during World War II, although there are scattered reports of...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2005 1 comments

Note the "EX DG" appellation in this new Sigma lens. This signifies a lens that you can use for both film and digital photography, as opposed to Sigma's "EX DC" branding, which can only be used with digital SLRs. The difference is in the image circle each projects. Use a "DC" lens on a film camera and you'll have serious...

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Omar Attum Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Omar Attum, All Rights Reserved

Wide angle lenses are my favorite types of lenses. They allow me to create striking 3D-like compositions, provide more depth of field, and fit more in the photograph, even in confined spaces. Although I regularly use a digital SLR, I often feel limited in using my Canon EOS 10D for landscape photographs because of the...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Dec 01, 2004 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Peter K. Burian, All Rights Reserved

The first interchangeable-lens autofocus SLR produced by Olympus, the E-1 was also the first digital camera to employ a "Four Thirds" CCD sensor. The smallest imager in any digital SLR camera, this one is roughly half the size of the 35mm film frame standard. Consequently, the effective focal...

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