Lenses

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

Because of the increasing number of D-SLRs with full-frame sensors, Tamron is upgrading several of their multi-platform lenses to the Digitally Integrated standard. The most recent model, the 70-200mm f/2.8 Di, is optimized for D-SLRs regardless of the sensor size but also provides outstanding results with 35mm SLRs. This zoom has benefited from several improvements, including closer focusing...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

The mid-range zoom I started with when I bought my Nikon D300 was no speed demon, and I was hankering for an f/2.8 lens in the (effective) 70-200mm range. What first attracted me to the Tokina AT-X 535 PRO DX was the fast, constant maximum aperture, providing a bright view every step of the way. What’s more, the barrel on this tele-zoom does not rotate when zoomed: all movement is entirely...

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Nov 01, 2008 1 comments

If you own and use an M-series Leica, a Zeiss Ikon, or a bayonet-mount Voigtländer Bessa, Leica’s 16-18-21mm Tri-Elmar is so staggeringly desirable that it is almost easier to list the reasons for not buying one than to list its advantages—though these are easy enough to list, too. It is compact, sweet handling, sharp, contrasty, rangefinder-coupled, unbelievably convenient, and...

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Understatement almost always speaks louder than overstatement; or if not louder, then generally with more authority. The four new Leica Summarits, for M-series Leicas, Zeiss Ikons, and Voigtländer Bessas, are about as far from ostentatious as you can get; they are merely first-class tools for the photographer who knows what he or she is doing.

Neither the...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Created chiefly for the high-end Nikon D300 and D3, the new 24mm PC (Perspective Control) lens from Nikon can also be used on other Nikon D-SLR cameras, such as the relatively new D60 on which I tested it, albeit with some loss of full automation and functionality. Being a manual focus lens it can also mount on most Nikon film SLRs as well; being a PC lens it is unique in both...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

If you ever want a unique point of view try a "fisheye" lens. Like looking through a door peephole (which in fact is a "fisheye" type) this order of lens sacrifices linear correction in favor of a very wide angle of view. Originally made for creating "full sky" images when pointed straight up, they had long ago been adopted by photographers for...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

I developed a love for fisheyes way back when I was shooting film. In fact, when I took the digital route, the first new lens I bought for my brand-new Canon EOS 5D was a fisheye.

I figured, what better way to celebrate my purchase of a full-frame D-SLR than with a lens that could take full advantage of the larger sensor! So now, fast forward to the purchase of a...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 24, 2008 Published: Jul 30, 2008 0 comments

The Sigma APO 150-50mm lens is a moderately fast, super-telephoto zoom designed to work with both APS-C and full-frame DSLR cameras. It offers quite useful close focusing (7.2 ft) and two modes of what they deem "optical stabilization" (OS.) Weighing in at 67.4 oz you always know its there, but then again this is one impressive piece of...

Shutterbug Staff Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

As part of our annual Photo Marketing Association (PMA) coverage we ask our reporters to deliver a "Best of Show" award. While each contributor had their own beat, we also asked them to go beyond their respective area of coverage to find what, for them, signified a breakthrough product, technology, or new trend that they felt would affect all photographers in the...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

Considering the many D-SLRs that are introduced each year, it's no surprise that virtually every lens manufacturer is also expanding its line of new products. That includes both digital-only lenses--for cameras with a typical small sensor--and multi-platform lenses suitable for any SLR. The latter are particularly important now because of the increasing number of...

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Jack Neubart Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

The expansive coverage of a 14mm lens may be more than you think you need. But you'd be surprised to discover that it reveals a world of possibilities that might otherwise escape you. While it certainly is ideal when shooting in open country, a super-wide lens can do wonders in tight quarters. To check out this lens, and along the way explore the potential of this focal...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Now that you've mastered the standard zoom lens that came with your D-SLR, you have to be asking yourself "what's next?" You bought a D-SLR instead of a compact camera so that you could change lenses. The question is: which lens to buy first? The answer is easy, but it all depends on what kind of pictures you like to take.

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Apr 01, 2008 1 comments

Tamron's various 28-300mm "ultra" zooms have been best sellers since their first model of this type was introduced in 1999. Each subsequent version featured improvements and this latest "4th generation" product is the most desirable to date, since it includes a Vibration Compensation stabilizer aside from a wealth of advanced optical technology. A...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

Although Sigma released their first lens with a built-in Optical Stabilizer (OS) system in the spring of 2004, the company employed this technology in only one pro-grade lens, the 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6. That has changed with the introduction of a more compact/affordable (digital-only) 18-200mm OS zoom. Sigma will not comment about future plans, but a reliable source indicates that...

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Steve Anchell Posted: Nov 01, 2007 1 comments

If photography is your pastime, you can afford to indulge in toys. If it is your occupation you tend to be more selective about what you spend your money on; toys are an extravagance--you couldn't afford 'em when you were struggling, and you don't need 'em now that you have a client base which likes your style.

But what if a toy is also...

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