Pro Techniques

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Jul 01, 1999 0 comments

"Your camera is like
a Geiger counter. It takes you to the right place. When it faces something
that doesn't interest you, there is no tick-ticking, but when
it faces something you like, it is tickingaway....

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Jun 01, 1999 0 comments

Marnie Crawford Samuelson
recalls one of her earliest influences, the photographer Sam Abell,
telling about a body of work he did on canoeing. His bosses were not
enthusiastic about the project initially but Abell hadst...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 1999 0 comments

Although we tend to take them for granted, batteries are an integral part of photography. Virtually every camera developed in the last 10 years becomes merely a paperweight without voltage to keep its mechanisms ticking. Unlike the previous generation which required power for little more than...

Rick Sammon Posted: Jun 01, 1999 0 comments

Many amateur photographers have a simple remedy for shooting in low-light conditions--they turn on their flash units and blast the hell out of a scene or subject. Well, that technique sure is effective. For a more pleasing and more creative picture...

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Jay Abend Posted: May 01, 1999 0 comments

One of the things that many good photographers struggle with is sharpness. I have spent years of my life working on getting the most tack-sharp images, and have even written a few stories for your favorite magazine explaining some of the things that I do...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: May 01, 1999 0 comments

Christine Triebert was looking
for a different way to photograph the landscape, an alternative process
that would be more subjective in nature, more abstract. She wanted to
continue working in silver since it would give...

Steve Bedell Posted: Apr 01, 1999 0 comments

Ah, Palm Beach. Just the mention of the name brings images of wealth and power to mind. Exotic cars, palatial estates, beautiful people, exclusive stores, and there's so much more--crystal skies, blue-green waters, the Intercoastal Waterway, yachts...

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Bob Coates Posted: Apr 01, 1999 0 comments

For those times when you want to isolate an object with a pleasing non-competing background, here is a system that will give you lots of options. It worked especially well when a client asked me to photograph individual pieces of jewelry to illustrate...

Rick Sammon Posted: Apr 01, 1999 0 comments

Travel photographers are a unique breed. Some go to the ends of the earth to get pictures that tell a story of a faraway land. Others stay relatively close to home, documenting the pulse of a major metropolitan city--which might be a travel destination to...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Mar 01, 1999 0 comments

If you ask Grace Hopkins-Lisle
where the greatest influence on her photography lies, she will probably
answer, "right here"--here being a small, odd-shaped, cement
house set pretty among trees at the end ofa...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Feb 01, 1999 3 comments

When Claire Yaffa showed
her photographs to Cornell Capa, he said, "You take pretty pictures,
Yaffa, but what do you really want to say?" Yaffa thought long
and hard about the question. She had always beenin...

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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 1999 0 comments

"The tone he produces on rough platinotype paper by skillful printing and carefully aged mercury baths cannot be reproduced by any mechanical process."
--George Bernard Shaw on the photographs of Frederick Evans

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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 1999 0 comments

Computer viruses are small, invasive programs written by malevolent and misanthropic misfits that are designed to create havoc within your computer system. You get computer viruses in the same way that you catch the human variety; through contact with...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jan 01, 1998 0 comments

Is there a serious photo enthusiast out there who doesn't harbor a desire to see his or her work published? Well, the vast majority I know would love to market their images to books, magazines, and advertising agencies. In fact, the most commonly...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 01, 1998 0 comments

Big. Everything about digital imaging with medium format film boils down to the joys and delights of working with large image files. A frame of medium format film dwarfs a 35mm negative or slide and while this bigness produces more image quality, it also...

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