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Rosalind Smith Posted: Nov 01, 2005 5 comments

The low, harsh light of late day played unmercifully on the withered body of an old woman, reflecting on the face of the beautiful baby she carried on her back. Eugene Richards saw the tall, angular 80-year-old woman, a rare sight in a drought-ridden land where people die long before their time.

"I was conscious of using my camera," Richards says. "I...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

If you've glanced at the photos and you're not laughing, you might think about skipping ahead to the next story. On these pages we're going to spend some time in the bemusement park that's the mind of Chip Simons, and if the weird light he's shining into the darkness didn't bring at least a smile, you're probably not going to enjoy the...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Oct 01, 2005 1 comments

Fifteen years ago Ann Johansson left Gothenburg, Sweden, and came to America. She was looking for "sunshine" but she may just have found the end of the rainbow. For seven years her real-life job was waitressing in Los Angeles. Her hobby was taking pictures.

"It took me a while to realize you could actually make a living here having a...

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Jim Miotke Posted: Sep 01, 2005 0 comments

Professional photographer Bryan F. Peterson splits his time between Seattle, Washington, and Lyon, France. He recently revised two best-selling how-to books, Understanding Exposure and Learning to See Creatively. Peterson also teaches online photography courses at www.BetterPhoto.com. In our discussion, we explored how...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Sep 01, 2005 0 comments

No way is Lauren Greenfield a mainstream photographer. Her genre falls into the realm of portraiture and social documentary but her true subject is loss of innocence in a society dominated by media exposure. Greenfield's focus is on the importance of image with young girls caught up in the rituals of pop culture.

Her photographic message is unsettling and...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Aug 01, 2005 0 comments

It is the daily life of schools, churches, education, home life, and street life that draws Ed Kashi. Looking at his photographs we are strongly aware of the man behind the camera, a man with strong questions and feelings about a place and its people.

Currently published worldwide, one of his best-known works includes a recent publication, Aging in America: The Years...

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Andre Costantini Posted: Aug 01, 2005 0 comments

Early in my photographic career, I found myself making images that I called "mistakes." This was because my favorite images were not always the ones that I intended to take, but in fact the ones that happened by "accident" I often liked better. I discovered that it was the overall process of making pictures that birthed good pictures. This understanding led...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jun 13, 2005 Published: Jul 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, David Middleton, All Rights Reserved

"The intoxication of exotica is overrated," David Middleton says. So if you're thinking of traveling far and wide in search of great outdoor and nature photographs, save your money and your time--at least until you've explored the familiar: your own backyard.

"It's...

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Steve Anchell Posted: Jul 01, 2005 0 comments

It was a hot and thirsty afternoon. A light thundershower had left the parched earth thirsting for more. Four of the roughest, toughest photographers in the Wild West met on the empty street in front of 21st Amendment liquor store. A challenge had been made and they were here to accept. Rough and ready "Wild Bill" Ellzey, sporting a Nikon D70, was leaning against the...

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Jim Porter Posted: Jul 01, 2005 1 comments

My own interest in panoramic photography actually started several years ago, before digital was a real option for photographers. Once I discovered medium and large format photography, my interest in panoramic photography grew. At that point I was using the special-purpose Fuji GX617 and the Noblex 175 for panoramas, and I was happy with the results. But even so, I had grown weary...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Golfers have it easy. United States Golf Association (USGA) rules limit players to one bag and 14 clubs. It's a different story when photographers pack their gear, however. Photographers are limited only by how much they can lift. Different equipment for different assignments, to be sure--but when we started peeking into the bags that professionals carry, we learned...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Barbara Kinney, All Rights Reserved

The think about the road less traveled is that it makes for a quicker commute. Barbara Kinney drives Seattle's Route 99 from her home to her job--she's a picture editor at The Seattle Times--and finds it a better way to go than the Interstate, which replaced 99 as the area's main highway.
...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Lori Stoll, All Rights Reserved

Got something you've always wanted to do, something that's long intrigued and attracted you, but you were way too busy with your career to go after? If you're lucky, one day you'll find the career's going along okay and you've got the time to chase down a dream or two.

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Lou Jones, All Rights Reserved

Having the good fortune to become involved wholly with an inspiration or an idea is pretty awesome, and as long as I have known Boston photographer Lou Jones he has been "involved." I don't think he has ever missed an Olympics event or turned away from his deep-rooted convictions about the death penalty...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Gil Lopez-Espina, All Rights Reserved

No matter how far we get from the starting point, there's always something that calls us back. Early influences, first goals, original career choices--they all have a way of hanging around at the edges, only to show up strong somewhere down the line.

That happened recently...

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