Features
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Jon Canfield Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Epson is really pushing the limits with desktop scanners, bringing near drum-scanner quality down to the sub-$800 price range. With two new scanners on display at PMA, Epson had the major news in this category. First up is the Perfection V700 PHOTO. With an estimated price of $549.99, the scanner uses Epson's Dual Lens optics. The Dual Lens System automatically selects...

Accessories, Features
Robert E. Mayer Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Duracell introduced their higher capacity 2650 mAh AA and 1000 mAh AAA rechargeable batteries, designed to meet the growing demands of high-drain devices. The Duracell 15 Minute Charger will charge one to four mAh AA cells in just 15 minutes. It will accept all standard AA or AAA Ni-MH batteries. The list price for the charger with four batteries is $40.

GP Batteries...

Accessories, Features
Roger W. Hicks Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Rubber chickens . Chocolate visiting cards. A camera support that looks (and performs) like a big, sticky limpet. Every bit as much as cameras, films, and imaging software, this weird and wonderful stuff is what the Photo Marketing Association show is about.

We are talking, after all, about marketing. It is literally their middle name.

Roger W. Hicks Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Perhaps the biggest surprise of the show, at least in conventional photography, was the new 35mm rangefinder stereo camera from Horseman. This shoots stereo pairs in the standard format--2x23x27mm in standard stereo mounts--so they can be projected or viewed with the binocular viewer that is supplied with the camera.

If the camera itself looks oddly...

Features, Paper & Ink
Jack Neubart Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

The obvious big news at this year's show was the "proliferation" of pigmented ink-based printers--and with that comes a new level of inks and print longevity. We used to think that pigmented inks could not deliver the color saturation and punch of dye-based inks, but that no longer appears to be the case with this new generation of inksets with expanded...

Jon Canfield Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

If there's anything you can count on with digital products, it's faster speeds, higher capacities, and lower costs. Nowhere is this truer than with memory cards. There was plenty of news from a variety of vendors.

SanDisk doubled the capacity of several of their most popular cards, including the Extreme III line of cards to 8GB in CompactFlash, and 2GB...

Features
Rosalind Smith May 01, 2006 0 comments

"There is something special about the ocean world, a certain allure, like a song that calls to me. I can't really explain this attraction; it's just there; inside--a part of who I am."
--Bill Curtsinger

For Bill Curtsinger, the darkest depths of the Antarctic are like a candy store. "Cold, remote, colorful, and...

Features
Shutterbug Staff Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

While touring the ancient town of Dolceaqua, Italy, we happened upon a wedding ceremony in progress at the antiquated church in the middle of the cobblestoned town square. An ornate carriage and a proud family waited for the bride and groom to emerge from the church. The air was festive, with flower petals covering the cobblestones and the family members milling about.
...

Features
Rosalind Smith Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

"The parade was at night. It was a beautiful evening. There were two to three hundred marchers and New Orleans actress Becky Allen became Queen Katrina, the reigning monarch of the Halloween parade this past October.

"New Orleanians have a way of turning tragedy into humor and some people came dressed as refrigerators. I was overcome with the celebration and...

Features
Heiner Henninges Feb 01, 2006 0 comments

Larry Fink's "Forbidden Pictures: A Political Tableau 2005" was one of the highlights at the biggest German photo exhibition "7th International Photo Days," which was located in the cities of Mannheim and Ludwigshafen.

The Larry Fink exhibition was a major part of a show entitled "Contemporary American...

Features
Barry Tanenbaum Feb 01, 2006 0 comments

So you wake up one morning and think, you know, what I'd really like to do is start my own photography workshop.

You or me, we hit the snooze button and see what we come up with after 10 more minutes of sleep. But not Steve Gottlieb. A commercial photographer with three books to his credit, Steve had been thinking about workshops. He had a close friend who...

Features
The Editors Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

As is our wont, in this issue we asked our contributors to give us their thoughts on what the future holds, be it gear, technology, or trends in photography. We received a wide range of opinions, from those proclaiming that film is finally dead to those who see diversity in image making as important. There's no doubt that many people still use and enjoy working with film.

Features
Barry Tanenbaum Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

Through the viewfinder David X. Tejada saw Bart Simpson strangling Saddam Hussein.

"It was at the time of the first Gulf War, and I was shooting at a mining site in Nevada," David says. "I've got a 300mm lens on the camera, and I'm directing a surveyor out in the field by walkie-talkie. I'm having him look through his surveying scope.

Features
Rosalind Smith Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

Seven of the world's leading photojournalists and documentary photographers came together to form Agency VII on September 9, 2001, just two days before our world changed forever.

Gary Knight, born and based in England, is a widely published journalist and award-winning photographer who was the driving force behind the group. He realized...

Features
Rosalind Smith Nov 01, 2005 5 comments

The low, harsh light of late day played unmercifully on the withered body of an old woman, reflecting on the face of the beautiful baby she carried on her back. Eugene Richards saw the tall, angular 80-year-old woman, a rare sight in a drought-ridden land where people die long before their time.

"I was conscious of using my camera," Richards says. "I...