Software & Computers

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

Someday an innovative manufacturer will market a memory card that changes color as it fills with images, then changes back again when it’s downloaded. Such a feature would make it easier to determine which cards are ready for formatting. That wouldn’t stop us from accidentally deleting a keeper now and again, but it might help us steer clear of total calamity. However, until...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

When it comes to choosing a display for your computer to do photographic image editing and color correction there is an old saying, "You can't control what you can't see." This should be your primary guide as to what to buy. ViewSonic has been a brand name associated with monitors and displays from the earliest days of personal computers and the company...

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John Brandon Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

In a perfect world, photos would magically transport themselves from your camera to a safe location, fully metatagged and color corrected. Alas, the professional's workflow is not that simple. In a digital age, a streamlined workflow hinges on two factors: photo viewing speed and editing agility.

Apple's Aperture 2.1 addresses both...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

In midwinter I had a sneak peek of a new color management product. I was lucky enough to get a beta unit then and have been using it for the past couple of months. But, I don't review beta products, so I've been holding out for the release version of the product, dubbed ColorMunki Photo (#1). The ColorMunki combines high-end technology with easy-to-use features and a...

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Steve Anchell Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

By the time you are reading this it will be almost a year and a half since Adobe Systems introduced Photoshop Lightroom (LR) 1.0. The introduction of the original version of LR took place after an extensive period of online beta testing by photographers from all over the world. The full release was followed by a series of updates which steadily improved the functionality of the...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 01, 2008 2 comments

Sending out a CD/DVD to a duplicating service can cost hundreds of dollars--and requires a minimum order, usually in the neighborhood of several hundred copies, which is not a practical solution for most of us. Yes, there are inkjets capable of printing on pre-labeled discs, but one thing they can't do is duplicate CDs and DVDs--and the process is limited to one...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Monitor calibration has become fairly mainstream over the past few years. Nearly everyone knows they should be calibrating their displays, and a fair percentage of them are actually doing it. And, with the cost and ease of use down into the normal (e.g., non-geek) level, there is really no reason to not calibrate your display.

Display calibration is important in...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Everyone knows that backing up your data is critical. And, everyone knows that it's easy to say, "I'll do it tomorrow." Heck, I've made tomorrow go for months at a time! This is really stupid on my part because I make a living from my images and writing. If I lose that data, I might as well start planning on moving into the car.

Luckily...

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Philip Andrews Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Remember the Polaroid? You push the button and the print is ejected and developed right before your eyes. But rather than settle for these "straight" prints, for many years professional image-makers used the unique features of this technology to create wonderfully textured images as well. The process involved transferring the image from the original to damp watercolor...

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Tony Sweet Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

High Dynamic Range (HDR) photography is definitely the rage these days. Actually, it's a bit more than a rage. It could give us a glimpse into the future of photography. A brief overview is that several images are made at different exposures, then the images are combined in software to create a single image, which can show detail in the dark areas and in the bright portions...

Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

Just about every one of us has suffered through at least one data disaster, where we’ve lost a significant number of photos or other important files.

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

Capture One 4 (CO4, if you will) is a raw file processor/organizer that shares many features, albeit with its own nomenclature and workflow, with products such as Apple's Aperture and Adobe's Lightroom. Competitively priced at $129 (for a two computer license), owners of Phase One's Capture One LE can upgrade to 4 free of charge, and Capture One PRO users can...

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Howard Millard Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

Would you like to transform your photos into digital artworks emulating oil paintings, watercolors, charcoal or pen and ink drawings at the click of your mouse? Or would you like to try your hand at digital drawing and painting? Whether you want to explore your creativity or expand the services you offer to clients, creating naturalistic art from your images has never been...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

You read the headline right--that new, off-the-shelf computer you just bought is colorblind! Even though your computer sends RGB color information to its display so colors will appear on the screen, the computer does not know what colors its user is seeing. That seems like a contradiction, unless you realize that personal computing hardware and software grew like topsy...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

Just as we view flare as non-image-forming light that detracts from a photograph, we can think of digital noise as non-image-forming picture elements (pixels) that detract from a digital image. We tend to look at digital noise as a nuisance, like bats in the attic. And we want to be rid of the problems as quickly and painlessly as possible while doing the least amount of damage.

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