Software & Computers

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

Adobe's Photoshop application is the standard for many digital photographers. Heck, it's even a verb now, as in "that looks Photoshopped." But, at $500 and up, depending on the packaging, Photoshop CS3 is overkill for many users. Recognizing that the majority of photographers don't want to be spending their time learning a complex program, Adobe...

Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

Color management isn't one of those topics that tend to get the heart racing with excitement, although the lack of it has probably caused more than a few panic attacks. We've seen steady improvements in color calibration hardware and software over the past few years and it's clear that color management is becoming much more mainstream than ever as digital...

Ibarionex R. Perello Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

As I walked the trade show floor at the recent PMA, it was interesting to see how much software was being offered to meet specific needs, rather than attempt to be the end-all and be-all. I discovered software that offers solutions not meant to replace Adobe's Photoshop, but rather help photographers improve their ability to achieve common and specific tasks.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

This report covers back-up systems and all sorts of storage devices, beginning with USB flash (thumb/pen) and handheld devices. In terms of backup, there was only one hardware solution worthy of note, plus a related product that uses DVDs. Beyond that, there are the plethora of digital photo frames, making it one of the hottest product categories at this year's show.
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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

As part of our annual Photo Marketing Association (PMA) coverage we ask our reporters to deliver a "Best of Show" award. While each contributor had their own beat, we also asked them to go beyond their respective area of coverage to find what, for them, signified a breakthrough product, technology, or new trend that they felt would affect all photographers in the...

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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

What do we do when it comes time to show our photos off to friends, family, and colleagues? There's no question that printing every picture is a time-consuming and costly process. But there's a better way--photo "slide" shows. But unlike slide shows of the past, which meant dimming the lights, setting up a screen, and dealing with sometimes quirky...

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David B. Brooks Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

In the summer of 2007 I received news about a new version of SilverFast scanning software that included additional and improved features, most significantly for this report something dubbed Multi-Exposure. This is a strategy involving two scan passes: one with normal exposure and a second with amplified exposure applied just to the shadow regions of the film image; then these two...

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Jon Canfield Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

I've written about the advantages of graphic tablets before, and most recently reviewed the Wacom Bamboo line of inexpensive tablets in these pages (see April 2008 issue). Today, I'm headed in the opposite direction and taking a look at the Cintiq 12WX tablet, also by Wacom.

What makes the Cintiq line different from the entry-level Bamboo...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

In the strictest technical terms, Color Efex Pro 3.0 may be a compatible plug-in but in reality it's an imaging environment that clings remora-like to Adobe's Photoshop, extending its capabilities and allowing you to produce incredible effects in little time. In that respect, Color Efex Pro 3.0 becomes a major productivity tool as well.

Interface...

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Phillip Andrews Posted: May 01, 2008 1 comments

Remember the Polaroid? You push the button and the print is ejected and developed right before your eyes. But rather than settle for these "straight" prints, for many years professional image-makers used the unique features of this technology to create wonderfully textured images as well. The process involved transferring the image from the original to damp watercolor...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Most serious digital photographers know that using a graphic tablet is the best way by far when it comes to editing and making selections in Photoshop and other imaging applications. There is a learning curve when switching from a mouse to a pen, but after using one I don't know of any photographers who would go back to the old method. Along with the finer control you have...

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Rod Lawton Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

If your computer's hard disk fails, and you don't have any kind of backup, you will lose your entire digital photo collection for good. You might not enjoy thinking about it, but it's a fact that has to be faced. In my opinion you shouldn't put too much faith in recovery utilities and specialist data recovery companies. The success of these depends on the...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Mar 01, 2008 1 comments

Shooting JPEG images is similar to shooting color negative film and handing the roll to a photo lab for processing and printing. The results--overall--are generally good. But someone else is making decisions about sharpness, white balance, saturation, and other vital parameters that determine how the final image looks. In the case of digital cameras, a group of engineers...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

Image-editing applications that run on a Windows PC have been available since the early 1990s. In that decade and a half digital photography has grown and changed dramatically, requiring new and different kinds of image-editing support. One of the applications that has been around for most of that time is Paint Shop Pro, now under Corel's ownership. Over the years it has...

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Rod Lawton Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

It's a fact of photographic life that some of the most exciting lighting conditions are also the most challenging. Bright sunlight produces intense colors but also areas of very deep shadow, and with heavily backlit subjects the difference in brightness between the highlights and shadows may be so great that one or the other must be sacrificed. And yet, the conventional...

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