Software & Computers

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David B. Brooks Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

Image-editing applications that run on a Windows PC have been available since the early 1990s. In that decade and a half digital photography has grown and changed dramatically, requiring new and different kinds of image-editing support. One of the applications that has been around for most of that time is Paint Shop Pro, now under Corel's ownership. Over the years it has...

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Rod Lawton Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

It's a fact of photographic life that some of the most exciting lighting conditions are also the most challenging. Bright sunlight produces intense colors but also areas of very deep shadow, and with heavily backlit subjects the difference in brightness between the highlights and shadows may be so great that one or the other must be sacrificed. And yet, the conventional...

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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

In this article, I'll be looking at some plug-in classics that have been around for a while, and at a couple of new programs as well. The new programs include a plug-ins package and a stand-alone application, originally created for motion picture-quality video that's also used to create impressive special effects in photos.

Corel's KPT...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

Mac users can use Aperture to attain good foundation monochrome images from digital camera and scanned RGB files. Because Aperture treats the original raw file as sacrosanct, and works in Versions from what it dubs the Master, many options can be explored before exporting the file to image-manipulation software for further refinement. As with any conversion software, I suggest...

Ben Willmore Posted: Feb 01, 2008 1 comments

Black & White
In previous versions of Photoshop, the most common method for converting a color image to black & white was to use the Channel Mixer. It was a clunky, counter-intuitive process that forced you to think like Photoshop instead of allowing your brain and eyes to naturally digest what was being done to your image. The new Black & White...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

There is a substantial interest in black and white among photo enthusiasts, particularly if you include infrared. That's why Epson, Canon, and HP developed printers capable of reproducing good black and white prints. On the camera side of digital, however, there is only one quite high-end black and white possibility I currently know of--the MegaVision medium format...

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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

There are literally thousands of plug-ins available for Adobe's Photoshop, from expensive applications created by major software vendors to freeware created by part-time graphic programmers. However, seldom does a plug-in have as close a relationship to Photoshop as Red Giant Software's Knoll Light Factory for Photoshop. The plug-in was created by Photoshop co-creator...

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Susan Ruddick Bloom Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

Corel's Painter (now in Version X) started years ago as a black and white program called Sketcher, which came in a cigar box package. Over the years it was owned by a variety of companies and was even sold in a paint can. The program has matured and is unrivaled in its ability to mimic natural artistic mediums like pastel, oil paint, charcoal, watercolor, and more.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

How can you make the most use out of that limited quantity of memory cards when on the road, especially on a long trip? The answer: a portable drive. When connected to a host computer via USB 2.0, all these devices are recognized as an external drive--but not immediately in some cases: it may require activation of a USB function on the device. Adding to the utility of many of...

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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

Adobe's Photoshop is unarguably the most popular photo editor in use today, although not everyone needs its myriad of features or is willing to spend the money to get them. There are options out there, among them Ulead's PhotoImpact 12. It's a feature-packed photo editor that may well offer you both the power and efficiency that you need, and do so at a very...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

Setting your images to music and adding transitions has always been a popular way to share digital photos, and with the latest crop of software, the options are better and easier than ever. You have the options included with your operating system--iPhoto for Mac users and Photo Story for Windows users. Both can create basic slide shows from your images, along with music...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

When Pantone introduced huey about a year ago, the device was noteworthy for a couple of reasons. The first was the price. At well under $100, it was clearly targeted to the more casual user than previous offerings had been. The huey was also one of the easiest calibration devices to use, and the only one that supported automatic adjustments for ambient light changes.
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Jason Schneider Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

About 31/2 years ago something happened that was destined to change my view of filters forever. I was talking shop with an old buddy who happens to be a veteran professional photographer and a bona fide digital guru. In the course of our brief conversation I mentioned that I was using optical filters--namely a graduated ND and a circular polarizer--for a D-SLR project I...

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Howard Millard Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

Compatible with both Mac and Windows, Corel's new Painter X can transform your portrait, landscape, and still life photos into images that emulate oil paint on canvas, charcoal on textured art paper, woodcut, silkscreen, watercolor, pastel, pencil drawing, mosaic tile, and scores of other natural art media. You can start by enlisting Version X's enhanced automatic...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jul 01, 2007 0 comments

It's not just hardware but software that's fueling the digital imaging revolution. Even the firmware inside cameras and printers is really software that tells the device what to do and how to do it. Adobe's Photoshop, which has become a virtual economy unto itself, generating its own trade shows, software add-ons, and an entire book industry has gotten so...

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