Lighting

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Wes Kroninger Posted: Apr 27, 2012 Published: Mar 01, 2012 4 comments
In his new book, Wes Kroninger’s Lighting (ISBN: 978-1-608952-54-0, Amherst Media, $34.95 US), the author and photographer draws on his experience as a portrait, commercial, and editorial photographer to present strategies that will help photographers bring out the beauty and character in all of their subjects—from kids, to businessmen, to fashion models.
Filed under
Steve Bedell Posted: Mar 01, 2011 1 comments

Most of us know about making outdoor portraits using the small fill flash on our cameras. But these photos have a “look” that tells everyone they were “made with flash.” They have a flat, often harsh look to them. A more sophisticated technique that can be accessed with many new cameras is the use of off-camera flash; you can even use multiple units controlled directly from the camera. I use...

Filed under
Robert E. Mayer Posted: Oct 01, 2009 4 comments

If you are relatively new to photography and have only digital cameras along with newer digital-oriented versions of major accessories, everything you have should be compatible and work properly together. But if you have been actively involved with photography for many years through the film-based era, you undoubtedly have older accessories designed for use with film cameras that you would also...

Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2009 3 comments

Much of my portrait and fashion photography is done on location, but living in a place like Colorado the models (and the photographer, too) just aren’t always in the mood to stomp around in the cold weather and snow. That’s when a studio comes in handy. Some photographers just prefer having complete control over the lighting. Instead of the hassle and cost of renting a studio, why not...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2008 4 comments

I've worked with all kinds of Internet photo studios over the years. Most consist of a light tent of sorts, with or without lights, and the materials used are translucent fabric or plastic. But I have never come across anything like the MyStudio 20 until now. It is definitely different. So, does different make it better, or even as functional as other tabletop setups?

...

Filed under
Norm Haughey Posted: Sep 01, 2008 1 comments

The impact and success of a studio portrait is often the combined result of lighting, composition, body language, lens choice, camera angle, clothing, color, texture, and even luck. With a few portrait techniques under your belt, however, your luck will improve dramatically. There are many portrait-making methods that can help you develop your own style over time and ultimately...

Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Nov 01, 2006 95 comments

Every photographer knows about visible light being used to capture photographic images digitally or with film, but there are other kinds of light that we can't see. Light with wavelengths from approximately 700 and 900nm (nanometers) is called infrared light. Interestingly, this band of infrared light is a thousand times wider than that of visible light, but is invisible to...

Filed under
Robert E. Mayer Posted: Oct 01, 2006 1 comments

Taking good close-up pictures of most any small subject a foot or less away from the lens is relatively easy these days, what with the macro-focusing capability found on some zoom lenses. That's no problem when you use available light. But what happens when you want or need to add auxiliary light to the scene? The tiny flash built into many current SLR cameras is designed to...

Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 01, 2006 4 comments

One of my favorite times to shoot landscapes is when a thick fog has descended on the land and engulfed everything in sight. It is a magical thing to experience, and for fine art nature photographers it doesn't get any better. We all love to shoot scenes with brilliant, saturated colors and crystal clear air typical of well-known national parks like Bryce Canyon and Monument...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 01, 2006 0 comments

In most cases when we talk to climbers who photograph or photographers who climb, we start out by asking which came first, the climbing or the photography. About 75 percent answer the former. Then we ask why they climb. The answer is usually some variation of "it's a thrill." And then, why they photograph, which brings a variation of "to capture the...

Filed under
Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2005 4 comments

There's an old photographer's joke that goes: "If God invented light, then the devil invented fluorescent light." How times do change. With digital capture, fluorescent light can be your friend and I don't mean those long tubes hanging in lighting fixtures from the ceiling. I'm talking about a new breed of portrait lighting tools designed...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2005 2 comments

Studio lighting often carries with it the stigma of high cost and high demands (on electricity and learning curve), but that is not necessarily the case. Studio lighting is only as complicated as you make it. You can buy an inexpensive set of lights that will do all you need, with a short learning curve, without fear of shorting circuits around the house. Augment these lights with...

Filed under
Jason Schneider Posted: Aug 01, 2005 0 comments

If there's one thing that makes pictures shot by leading professional photographers stand out from the pack, it's lighting. But while it's relatively easy to get precisely controlled lighting effects in a well-equipped studio, these pros have to deliver consistent studio-quality results in the field--whether they're shooting on location in a dark...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Jan 01, 2005 1 comments

All Photos © 2004, Peter K. Burian, All Rights Reserved

"This excerpt was taken from Mastering Digital Photography and Imaging © 2003, SYBEX Inc. Used by permission. All rights reserved."

Flash has come a long way from the old days when photographers were required to make complex calculations to get a good flash exposure. Almost all digital cameras...

Filed under
Jay Abend Posted: Oct 01, 2004 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Jay Abend, All Rights Reserved

The look of flash photography has been a problem for photographers for decades. As we migrated from huge silver reflectors stuffed with flash bulbs to smaller and more portable electronic flash units, the look of on-camera...

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading